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Coworker Relationships and Informal Communication in High-Intensity Telecommuting

Coworker Relationships and Informal Communication in High-Intensity Telecommuting Given that high-intensity telecommuters report feeling socially isolated, this study uses structuration and constructivist theories to examine the role of coworker relationships and informal communication in the context of high-intensity telecommuting. Teleworkers' organizational commitment, job satisfaction, informal communication with peers, and coworker liking were examined. Coworker liking was positively related to teleworkers' informal communication satisfaction with coworkers, and with their organizational commitment and job satisfaction. Complaining talk was negatively related to teleworkers' commitment and satisfaction; informal communication satisfaction was positively related to organizational commitment. Coworker liking moderated the effect of teleworkers' complaining talk on organizational commitment, but not job satisfaction. The buffering effect of coworker relationships is discussed as a resource for organizational members engaged in high-intensity telecommuting. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Applied Communication Research Taylor & Francis

Coworker Relationships and Informal Communication in High-Intensity Telecommuting

20 pages

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References (61)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright National Communication Association
ISSN
1479-5752
eISSN
0090-9882
DOI
10.1080/00909882.2011.556136
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Given that high-intensity telecommuters report feeling socially isolated, this study uses structuration and constructivist theories to examine the role of coworker relationships and informal communication in the context of high-intensity telecommuting. Teleworkers' organizational commitment, job satisfaction, informal communication with peers, and coworker liking were examined. Coworker liking was positively related to teleworkers' informal communication satisfaction with coworkers, and with their organizational commitment and job satisfaction. Complaining talk was negatively related to teleworkers' commitment and satisfaction; informal communication satisfaction was positively related to organizational commitment. Coworker liking moderated the effect of teleworkers' complaining talk on organizational commitment, but not job satisfaction. The buffering effect of coworker relationships is discussed as a resource for organizational members engaged in high-intensity telecommuting.

Journal

Journal of Applied Communication ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: May 1, 2011

Keywords: Telecommuting; Organizational Commitment; Job Satisfaction; Informal Communication; Coworker Relationships

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