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‘Community fear and harassment’: learning difficulties and hate crime incidents in the north-east of England

‘Community fear and harassment’: learning difficulties and hate crime incidents in the north-east... The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between impairment, disabling barriers and risk factors relating to hate crime incidents. The study analyses quantitative data collected in 2011–2012 where there were 81 incidents of disability hate crime reported in the Tyne and Wear area of England. The research discovered that in the Tyne and Wear region people with learning difficulties have a greater likelihood of experiencing hate crime than do people with other impairments. Although there was no significant difference between impairment and types of hate crime incidents recorded (i.e. verbal abuse/harassment, violence and criminal damage), there were distinct differences between police and victim support responses to victims which correlated to impairment categories (p ≤ 0.05). The study concludes by suggesting that owing to specific disabling barriers experienced by people with learning difficulties, this group is at increased risk of being victimised and is less likely to receive support from criminal justice agencies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Disability & Society Taylor & Francis

‘Community fear and harassment’: learning difficulties and hate crime incidents in the north-east of England

Disability & Society , Volume 30 (3): 15 – Mar 16, 2015
15 pages

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References (35)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
© 2015 Taylor & Francis
ISSN
1360-0508
eISSN
0968-7599
DOI
10.1080/09687599.2015.1009000
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The aim of this study is to examine the relationship between impairment, disabling barriers and risk factors relating to hate crime incidents. The study analyses quantitative data collected in 2011–2012 where there were 81 incidents of disability hate crime reported in the Tyne and Wear area of England. The research discovered that in the Tyne and Wear region people with learning difficulties have a greater likelihood of experiencing hate crime than do people with other impairments. Although there was no significant difference between impairment and types of hate crime incidents recorded (i.e. verbal abuse/harassment, violence and criminal damage), there were distinct differences between police and victim support responses to victims which correlated to impairment categories (p ≤ 0.05). The study concludes by suggesting that owing to specific disabling barriers experienced by people with learning difficulties, this group is at increased risk of being victimised and is less likely to receive support from criminal justice agencies.

Journal

Disability & SocietyTaylor & Francis

Published: Mar 16, 2015

Keywords: hate crime; learning difficulties; disabling barriers; police; victim support; quantitative study

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