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Analyzing Patient Participation in Medical Encounters

Analyzing Patient Participation in Medical Encounters HEALTH COMMUNICATION, 13(1), 61–73 Copyright © 2001, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Analyzing Patient Participation in Medical Encounters Richard L. Street, Jr. and Bradford Millay Department of Speech Communication Texas A&M University An essential component of the delivery of health care is the consultation between the patient and health care provider. Participation in the medical consultation is funda- mentally a communicative event in which clinicians and patients use talk to ex- change information, to share their expertise and points of view, to build a trusting re- lationship, and to make health-related decisions. A growing body of evidence indicates that patients who more actively participate in these encounters are more satisfied with their health care, receive more patient-centered care (e.g., information, support) from providers, are more committed to treatment regimens, have a stronger sense of control over health, and even experience better health following the visit than do more passive patients (for reviews, see Kaplan, Greenfield, & Ware, 1989; Roter & Hall, 1993; Street, 2001). Because patient involvement is an important part of the health care process, it is imperative that investigators analyze the phenomenon using reliable and valid measures that have a solid conceptual foundation. In this article, we have http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Health Communication Taylor & Francis

Analyzing Patient Participation in Medical Encounters

Health Communication , Volume 13 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 2001

Analyzing Patient Participation in Medical Encounters

Health Communication , Volume 13 (1): 13 – Jan 1, 2001

Abstract

HEALTH COMMUNICATION, 13(1), 61–73 Copyright © 2001, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Analyzing Patient Participation in Medical Encounters Richard L. Street, Jr. and Bradford Millay Department of Speech Communication Texas A&M University An essential component of the delivery of health care is the consultation between the patient and health care provider. Participation in the medical consultation is funda- mentally a communicative event in which clinicians and patients use talk to ex- change information, to share their expertise and points of view, to build a trusting re- lationship, and to make health-related decisions. A growing body of evidence indicates that patients who more actively participate in these encounters are more satisfied with their health care, receive more patient-centered care (e.g., information, support) from providers, are more committed to treatment regimens, have a stronger sense of control over health, and even experience better health following the visit than do more passive patients (for reviews, see Kaplan, Greenfield, & Ware, 1989; Roter & Hall, 1993; Street, 2001). Because patient involvement is an important part of the health care process, it is imperative that investigators analyze the phenomenon using reliable and valid measures that have a solid conceptual foundation. In this article, we have

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References (33)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-7027
eISSN
1041-0236
DOI
10.1207/S15327027HC1301_06
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

HEALTH COMMUNICATION, 13(1), 61–73 Copyright © 2001, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, Inc. Analyzing Patient Participation in Medical Encounters Richard L. Street, Jr. and Bradford Millay Department of Speech Communication Texas A&M University An essential component of the delivery of health care is the consultation between the patient and health care provider. Participation in the medical consultation is funda- mentally a communicative event in which clinicians and patients use talk to ex- change information, to share their expertise and points of view, to build a trusting re- lationship, and to make health-related decisions. A growing body of evidence indicates that patients who more actively participate in these encounters are more satisfied with their health care, receive more patient-centered care (e.g., information, support) from providers, are more committed to treatment regimens, have a stronger sense of control over health, and even experience better health following the visit than do more passive patients (for reviews, see Kaplan, Greenfield, & Ware, 1989; Roter & Hall, 1993; Street, 2001). Because patient involvement is an important part of the health care process, it is imperative that investigators analyze the phenomenon using reliable and valid measures that have a solid conceptual foundation. In this article, we have

Journal

Health CommunicationTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2001

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