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An Examination Of The Validity Of Two Models Of Attitude

An Examination Of The Validity Of Two Models Of Attitude A structural equation methodology is used to assess the reliability and validity of expectancy-value and semantic differential measures of attitude toward the act of donating blood. Hypotheses as to the internal consistency and the convergent, concurrent, discriminant, predictive, and nomological validities of responses are tested in the context of a quasi-experiment performed on 284 students, faculty, and staff. Semantic differential attitudes are found to exist as unidimensional responses while expectancy-value attitudes are found to occur as multidimensional reactions. However, although both operationalizations achieve convergent, concurrent, discriminant, and predictive validity, the nomological validity of attitude is brought into question. The extent of past behavior and the elapsed time since performance of that behavior appear to offer the greatest explanatory content for subsequent behavioral intentions. Finally, the role of personal and social normative beliefs as copredictors of intentions along with attitude and past behavior is also investigated. The findings are interpreted from attitude, learning, and attribution theory arguments. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Multivariate Behavioral Research Taylor & Francis

An Examination Of The Validity Of Two Models Of Attitude

Multivariate Behavioral Research , Volume 16 (3): 37 – Jul 1, 1981

An Examination Of The Validity Of Two Models Of Attitude

Multivariate Behavioral Research , Volume 16 (3): 37 – Jul 1, 1981

Abstract

A structural equation methodology is used to assess the reliability and validity of expectancy-value and semantic differential measures of attitude toward the act of donating blood. Hypotheses as to the internal consistency and the convergent, concurrent, discriminant, predictive, and nomological validities of responses are tested in the context of a quasi-experiment performed on 284 students, faculty, and staff. Semantic differential attitudes are found to exist as unidimensional responses while expectancy-value attitudes are found to occur as multidimensional reactions. However, although both operationalizations achieve convergent, concurrent, discriminant, and predictive validity, the nomological validity of attitude is brought into question. The extent of past behavior and the elapsed time since performance of that behavior appear to offer the greatest explanatory content for subsequent behavioral intentions. Finally, the role of personal and social normative beliefs as copredictors of intentions along with attitude and past behavior is also investigated. The findings are interpreted from attitude, learning, and attribution theory arguments.

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References (30)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-7906
eISSN
0027-3171
DOI
10.1207/s15327906mbr1603_4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A structural equation methodology is used to assess the reliability and validity of expectancy-value and semantic differential measures of attitude toward the act of donating blood. Hypotheses as to the internal consistency and the convergent, concurrent, discriminant, predictive, and nomological validities of responses are tested in the context of a quasi-experiment performed on 284 students, faculty, and staff. Semantic differential attitudes are found to exist as unidimensional responses while expectancy-value attitudes are found to occur as multidimensional reactions. However, although both operationalizations achieve convergent, concurrent, discriminant, and predictive validity, the nomological validity of attitude is brought into question. The extent of past behavior and the elapsed time since performance of that behavior appear to offer the greatest explanatory content for subsequent behavioral intentions. Finally, the role of personal and social normative beliefs as copredictors of intentions along with attitude and past behavior is also investigated. The findings are interpreted from attitude, learning, and attribution theory arguments.

Journal

Multivariate Behavioral ResearchTaylor & Francis

Published: Jul 1, 1981

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