Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

An Assessment of the Prevalence, Severity, and Verifiability of Entry-Level Applicant Faking Using the Randomized Response Technique

An Assessment of the Prevalence, Severity, and Verifiability of Entry-Level Applicant Faking... The issue of applicant response distortion is a potentially important concern for those who administer noncognitive self-report selection measures. Although it is clear that noncognitive measures can be easily faked and that faking may reduce the utility of these measures, there has been a paucity of research that has directly assessed the prevalence of applicant response distortion. This study used the randomized-response technique to estimate the base rate of entry-level job applicant faking during the application process. The results revealed that a substantial number of recent job applicants did report engaging in varying degrees of misrepresentation, and that the base rate for faking is strongly related to both the severity and verifiability of the deceptive behavior. Implications for personnel selection are presented. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Performance Taylor & Francis

An Assessment of the Prevalence, Severity, and Verifiability of Entry-Level Applicant Faking Using the Randomized Response Technique

An Assessment of the Prevalence, Severity, and Verifiability of Entry-Level Applicant Faking Using the Randomized Response Technique

Human Performance , Volume 16 (1): 26 – Jan 1, 2003

Abstract

The issue of applicant response distortion is a potentially important concern for those who administer noncognitive self-report selection measures. Although it is clear that noncognitive measures can be easily faked and that faking may reduce the utility of these measures, there has been a paucity of research that has directly assessed the prevalence of applicant response distortion. This study used the randomized-response technique to estimate the base rate of entry-level job applicant faking during the application process. The results revealed that a substantial number of recent job applicants did report engaging in varying degrees of misrepresentation, and that the base rate for faking is strongly related to both the severity and verifiability of the deceptive behavior. Implications for personnel selection are presented.

Loading next page...
 
/lp/taylor-francis/an-assessment-of-the-prevalence-severity-and-verifiability-of-entry-swYcCuwj3u

References (49)

Publisher
Taylor & Francis
Copyright
Copyright Taylor & Francis Group, LLC
ISSN
1532-7043
eISSN
0895-9285
DOI
10.1207/S15327043HUP1601_4
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The issue of applicant response distortion is a potentially important concern for those who administer noncognitive self-report selection measures. Although it is clear that noncognitive measures can be easily faked and that faking may reduce the utility of these measures, there has been a paucity of research that has directly assessed the prevalence of applicant response distortion. This study used the randomized-response technique to estimate the base rate of entry-level job applicant faking during the application process. The results revealed that a substantial number of recent job applicants did report engaging in varying degrees of misrepresentation, and that the base rate for faking is strongly related to both the severity and verifiability of the deceptive behavior. Implications for personnel selection are presented.

Journal

Human PerformanceTaylor & Francis

Published: Jan 1, 2003

There are no references for this article.