Illuminating Boccaccio: Visual Translation in Early Fifteenth-Century France

Illuminating Boccaccio: Visual Translation in Early Fifteenth-Century France ILLUMINATING BOCCACCIO VISUAL TRANSLATION IN EARLY FIFTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE Anne D. Hedeman In late fourteenth- and early fifteenth-century Paris, interaction between members of the chancellery, the university community, and the royal family generated a rich intellectual climate in which visual and textual translation flourished and were inextricably intertwined in books made for royalty and members of the nobility.1 Contact with Italian literature at the papal court in Avignon at the turn of the fifteenth century sparked interest in translating Boccaccio's work for the French courtly elite. Because of the popularity of illuminated manuscripts among the elite, translators drawn from the French chancellery sought to shape the reception of translations of Boccaccio through the interaction between translated text and visual imagery.2 Petrarch had translated one story from the Decameron--that of Griselda--into Latin circa 1373 and in doing so both emphasized its value as a source of moral philosophy and began to shape Boccaccio's reception.3 Around 1384, Philippe de Mezières translated Petrarch's Griselda into French and incorporated it in Le Miroir des dames mariées.4 Beginning in the 1400s, Boccaccio's Latin De casibus virorum illustrium was known in Paris and mined as a source of exempla for, among others, Nicolas de Gonesse's http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mediaevalia State University of New York Press

Illuminating Boccaccio: Visual Translation in Early Fifteenth-Century France

Mediaevalia, Volume 34 – Sep 26, 2013

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State University of New York Press
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Copyright © State University of New York Press
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2161-8046
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Abstract

ILLUMINATING BOCCACCIO VISUAL TRANSLATION IN EARLY FIFTEENTH-CENTURY FRANCE Anne D. Hedeman In late fourteenth- and early fifteenth-century Paris, interaction between members of the chancellery, the university community, and the royal family generated a rich intellectual climate in which visual and textual translation flourished and were inextricably intertwined in books made for royalty and members of the nobility.1 Contact with Italian literature at the papal court in Avignon at the turn of the fifteenth century sparked interest in translating Boccaccio's work for the French courtly elite. Because of the popularity of illuminated manuscripts among the elite, translators drawn from the French chancellery sought to shape the reception of translations of Boccaccio through the interaction between translated text and visual imagery.2 Petrarch had translated one story from the Decameron--that of Griselda--into Latin circa 1373 and in doing so both emphasized its value as a source of moral philosophy and began to shape Boccaccio's reception.3 Around 1384, Philippe de Mezières translated Petrarch's Griselda into French and incorporated it in Le Miroir des dames mariées.4 Beginning in the 1400s, Boccaccio's Latin De casibus virorum illustrium was known in Paris and mined as a source of exempla for, among others, Nicolas de Gonesse's

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MediaevaliaState University of New York Press

Published: Sep 26, 2013

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