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Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World by Timothy Morton (review)

Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World by Timothy Morton (review) book reviews Timothy Morton, Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013, 229 pp. ISBN 9780816689231 Claire Colebrook I would have thought that the days of trashing deconstruction (accusing it of relativism) and blaming it for bad behavior were over. That would be too hasty. Zadie Smith, imagining explaining herself to a future generation for whom the world is almost over, falls back on the notion of a bad relativism that precluded us from facing up to the cold hard facts of climate change. Yes, the world can change radically, and perhaps it was over-theorizing that precluded us from confronting the inconvenient truth of that reality: This will no doubt look very peculiar to my seven-year-old granddaughter. I don't expect she will forgive me, but it might be useful for her to get a glimpse into the mindset, if only for the purposes of comprehension. What shall I tell her? Her teachers will already have explained that what was happening to the weather, in 2014, was an inconvenient truth, financially, politically--but that's perfectly obvious, even now. A global movement of the people might have forced it onto the political agenda, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png philoSOPHIA suny_press

Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World by Timothy Morton (review)

philoSOPHIA , Volume 5 (2) – Feb 3, 2015

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State University of New York Press
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Copyright © State University of New York Press
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2155-0905
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Abstract

book reviews Timothy Morton, Hyperobjects: Philosophy and Ecology After the End of the World Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2013, 229 pp. ISBN 9780816689231 Claire Colebrook I would have thought that the days of trashing deconstruction (accusing it of relativism) and blaming it for bad behavior were over. That would be too hasty. Zadie Smith, imagining explaining herself to a future generation for whom the world is almost over, falls back on the notion of a bad relativism that precluded us from facing up to the cold hard facts of climate change. Yes, the world can change radically, and perhaps it was over-theorizing that precluded us from confronting the inconvenient truth of that reality: This will no doubt look very peculiar to my seven-year-old granddaughter. I don't expect she will forgive me, but it might be useful for her to get a glimpse into the mindset, if only for the purposes of comprehension. What shall I tell her? Her teachers will already have explained that what was happening to the weather, in 2014, was an inconvenient truth, financially, politically--but that's perfectly obvious, even now. A global movement of the people might have forced it onto the political agenda,

Journal

philoSOPHIAsuny_press

Published: Feb 3, 2015

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