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Hyper-Abjects: Finitude, “Sustainability,” and the Maternal Body in the Anthropocene

Hyper-Abjects: Finitude, “Sustainability,” and the Maternal Body in the Anthropocene Bethany Doane The concept of the Anthropocene prioritizes a new paradigmatic scale that seems to outweigh that of "the political": imagining deep time or the death of the human species as a result of climate change tends to negate the (relatively speaking) smaller-scale concerns of race, class, gender, or capitalism. While feminist critique is often circumscribed by this political scale, and thus may seem to be dwarfed or rendered obsolete by the geological, deep-time scale of the Anthropocene, examining issues of feminist concern from this geological perspective has profound implications for thinking not only of gender politics but also of how to construct something like the political at all in this new era. Suggesting a new and normative global politics is, of course, beyond the scope of this article, but perhaps we might begin to conceive of a political schema that would function more appropriately in light of this grander scale. At the very least we may begin to think the borders or limits of the species as it has existed in the modern era in a way that neither environmentalism nor posthumanism has yet been able to sufficiently tackle. The Anthropocene marks the epoch in which human http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png philoSOPHIA suny_press

Hyper-Abjects: Finitude, “Sustainability,” and the Maternal Body in the Anthropocene

philoSOPHIA , Volume 5 (2) – Feb 3, 2015

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State University of New York Press
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Copyright © State University of New York Press
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2155-0905
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Abstract

Bethany Doane The concept of the Anthropocene prioritizes a new paradigmatic scale that seems to outweigh that of "the political": imagining deep time or the death of the human species as a result of climate change tends to negate the (relatively speaking) smaller-scale concerns of race, class, gender, or capitalism. While feminist critique is often circumscribed by this political scale, and thus may seem to be dwarfed or rendered obsolete by the geological, deep-time scale of the Anthropocene, examining issues of feminist concern from this geological perspective has profound implications for thinking not only of gender politics but also of how to construct something like the political at all in this new era. Suggesting a new and normative global politics is, of course, beyond the scope of this article, but perhaps we might begin to conceive of a political schema that would function more appropriately in light of this grander scale. At the very least we may begin to think the borders or limits of the species as it has existed in the modern era in a way that neither environmentalism nor posthumanism has yet been able to sufficiently tackle. The Anthropocene marks the epoch in which human

Journal

philoSOPHIAsuny_press

Published: Feb 3, 2015

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