Get 20M+ Full-Text Papers For Less Than $1.50/day. Start a 14-Day Trial for You or Your Team.

Learn More →

Honeyed Words and Waxen Tablets: Aldhelm’s Bees and the Materiality of Anglo-Saxon Literacy

Honeyed Words and Waxen Tablets: Aldhelm’s Bees and the Materiality of Anglo-Saxon Literacy HONEYED WORDS AND WAXEN TABLETS ALDHELM’S BEES AND THE MATERIALITY OF ANGLO-SAXON LITERACY Lisa M. C. Weston Sometime between 716 and 718, the Anglo-Saxon nun Ecgburg proclaims her friendship with the missionary Boniface, a friendship strong and deep despite the distance between them. “Karitatis tuae copulam . . . gustavi [I have tasted the bonds of your affection],” she writes, and with the taste of it “quasi quiddam mellitae dulcedinis meis visceribus hic sapor insidet [my very inmost soul is filled with a sweetness as of honey].” She borrows her words—in particular the formula mellitae dulcedinis and an echo of the verb gusto—from those of Aldhelm in his Prosa de Virginitate explaining how, just as “mellitae dulcedinis gustus ammodum incomparabiliter praecelit [the taste of honeyed sweetness excels everything that is experienced as pleasing and delectable when brought to human mouths],” so monastic vir- ginity excels all other states. Ecburg’s borrowing reveals more than simple literary influence. For both Ecgburg and Aldhelm, the sweet - ness of honey is a real and familiar taste, and the bee is more than a metaphor. The honey on the community’s table, the beeswax on the writing tablets on which these words were composed, http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mediaevalia suny_press

Honeyed Words and Waxen Tablets: Aldhelm’s Bees and the Materiality of Anglo-Saxon Literacy

Mediaevalia , Volume 41 – Sep 2, 2020

Loading next page...
 
/lp/state-university-of-new-york-press/honeyed-words-and-waxen-tablets-aldhelm-s-bees-and-the-materiality-of-QJ2QmzY44n
Publisher
State University of New York Press
Copyright
Copyright © State University of New York Press
ISSN
2161-8046

Abstract

HONEYED WORDS AND WAXEN TABLETS ALDHELM’S BEES AND THE MATERIALITY OF ANGLO-SAXON LITERACY Lisa M. C. Weston Sometime between 716 and 718, the Anglo-Saxon nun Ecgburg proclaims her friendship with the missionary Boniface, a friendship strong and deep despite the distance between them. “Karitatis tuae copulam . . . gustavi [I have tasted the bonds of your affection],” she writes, and with the taste of it “quasi quiddam mellitae dulcedinis meis visceribus hic sapor insidet [my very inmost soul is filled with a sweetness as of honey].” She borrows her words—in particular the formula mellitae dulcedinis and an echo of the verb gusto—from those of Aldhelm in his Prosa de Virginitate explaining how, just as “mellitae dulcedinis gustus ammodum incomparabiliter praecelit [the taste of honeyed sweetness excels everything that is experienced as pleasing and delectable when brought to human mouths],” so monastic vir- ginity excels all other states. Ecburg’s borrowing reveals more than simple literary influence. For both Ecgburg and Aldhelm, the sweet - ness of honey is a real and familiar taste, and the bee is more than a metaphor. The honey on the community’s table, the beeswax on the writing tablets on which these words were composed,

Journal

Mediaevaliasuny_press

Published: Sep 2, 2020

There are no references for this article.