“You Can Steal Livestock but You Can’t Steal Trees.” The Livelihood Benefits of Agroforestry during and after Violent Conflict

“You Can Steal Livestock but You Can’t Steal Trees.” The Livelihood Benefits of... While violent conflict affects the lives of 1.5 billion people globally, little is known about how such people support and feed themselves. We explore how agroforestry may be used as a livelihood strategy to build livelihood resilience during and immediately after violent conflict. Research was conducted in Burat, Kenya, which underwent violent conflict over local ethnic politics and control in 2012 before the 2013 elections. Research included 13 qualitative case study households and 187 quantitative household surveys. Major livelihood coping strategies during the conflict included aid, help from relatives, and casual labor, with agroforestry as a supplementary livelihood activity for some. Our results are context-specific, but suggest that agroforestry can build livelihood resilience during and after conflict by providing income and food, places to hide from attackers, and construction materials for rebuilding homes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Ecology Springer Journals

“You Can Steal Livestock but You Can’t Steal Trees.” The Livelihood Benefits of Agroforestry during and after Violent Conflict

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Social Sciences; Anthropology; Environmental Management; Geography, general; Sociology, general
ISSN
0300-7839
eISSN
1572-9915
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10745-017-9922-5
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

While violent conflict affects the lives of 1.5 billion people globally, little is known about how such people support and feed themselves. We explore how agroforestry may be used as a livelihood strategy to build livelihood resilience during and immediately after violent conflict. Research was conducted in Burat, Kenya, which underwent violent conflict over local ethnic politics and control in 2012 before the 2013 elections. Research included 13 qualitative case study households and 187 quantitative household surveys. Major livelihood coping strategies during the conflict included aid, help from relatives, and casual labor, with agroforestry as a supplementary livelihood activity for some. Our results are context-specific, but suggest that agroforestry can build livelihood resilience during and after conflict by providing income and food, places to hide from attackers, and construction materials for rebuilding homes.

Journal

Human EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Jul 4, 2017

References

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