You are measuring the decision to be fast, not inattention: the Sustained Attention to Response Task does not measure sustained attention

You are measuring the decision to be fast, not inattention: the Sustained Attention to Response... The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) has been widely used in psychological literature as a measure of vigi- lance (the ability to sustain attention over a prolonged period of time). This task uses a Go/No-Go paradigm and requires the participants to repetitively respond to the stimuli as quickly and as accurately as possible. Previous literature indicates that performance in SART is subjected to a “speed–accuracy trade-off” (SATO) resulting from strategy choices and from the failures of controlling motor reflexes. In this study, 36 participants (n = 36) performed a series of four SARTs. The results support the perspective of strategy choice in SART and suggest that within-subjects SATO in SART should also be acknowledged in attempting to explain SART performance. The implications of the speed–accuracy trade-off should be fully understood when the SART is being used as a measure or tool. Keywords Sustained Attention to Response Task · Speed–accuracy trade-off · Within-subject speed–accuracy trade-off (SATO) Introduction nature of target appearance (Manly et al. 1999). There is, however, an ongoing debate regarding whether errors of The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART; Robert- commission, responding to the No-Go stimuli, are indica- son et al. 1997) is a short duration Go-No–Go task in which tive http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Brain Research Springer Journals

You are measuring the decision to be fast, not inattention: the Sustained Attention to Response Task does not measure sustained attention

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology
ISSN
0014-4819
eISSN
1432-1106
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00221-018-5291-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) has been widely used in psychological literature as a measure of vigi- lance (the ability to sustain attention over a prolonged period of time). This task uses a Go/No-Go paradigm and requires the participants to repetitively respond to the stimuli as quickly and as accurately as possible. Previous literature indicates that performance in SART is subjected to a “speed–accuracy trade-off” (SATO) resulting from strategy choices and from the failures of controlling motor reflexes. In this study, 36 participants (n = 36) performed a series of four SARTs. The results support the perspective of strategy choice in SART and suggest that within-subjects SATO in SART should also be acknowledged in attempting to explain SART performance. The implications of the speed–accuracy trade-off should be fully understood when the SART is being used as a measure or tool. Keywords Sustained Attention to Response Task · Speed–accuracy trade-off · Within-subject speed–accuracy trade-off (SATO) Introduction nature of target appearance (Manly et al. 1999). There is, however, an ongoing debate regarding whether errors of The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART; Robert- commission, responding to the No-Go stimuli, are indica- son et al. 1997) is a short duration Go-No–Go task in which tive

Journal

Experimental Brain ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: May 30, 2018

References

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