Women and depression: An update on the report of the APA task force

Women and depression: An update on the report of the APA task force This article reviews selected research on gender differences in depression in order to update the status of the literature and address concerns raised by the APA Task Force on women and depression. Recent research continues to provide considerable evidence that women experience higher rates of depression and that a variety of biological and psychological factors and their interactions must be considered to understand gender differences. Methodological issues including the need to define homogeneous subgroups, the effect of demographic variables, and sex bias in the diagnosis and measurement of depression are discussed. Conclusions are drawn that have implications for the prevention, identification and treatment of depression, and suggestions are made for research strategies. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Women and depression: An update on the report of the APA task force

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 1997 by Plenum Publishing Corporation
Subject
Psychology; Personality & Social Psychology; Sexual Behavior; Interdisciplinary Studies; Sociology; Anthropology
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/BF02766649
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article reviews selected research on gender differences in depression in order to update the status of the literature and address concerns raised by the APA Task Force on women and depression. Recent research continues to provide considerable evidence that women experience higher rates of depression and that a variety of biological and psychological factors and their interactions must be considered to understand gender differences. Methodological issues including the need to define homogeneous subgroups, the effect of demographic variables, and sex bias in the diagnosis and measurement of depression are discussed. Conclusions are drawn that have implications for the prevention, identification and treatment of depression, and suggestions are made for research strategies.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Nov 24, 2007

References

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