Why the Academic Pipeline Leaks: Fewer Men than Women Perceive Barriers to Becoming Professors

Why the Academic Pipeline Leaks: Fewer Men than Women Perceive Barriers to Becoming Professors Women are underrepresented in the professoriate compared to men; this study was designed to examine whether systemic barriers associated with parenting discourage women from pursuing academic careers. Data from 468 female and male graduate students were collected through an online questionnaire. More men than women intend to pursue academic careers. Parenting and mobility issues—but not research or teaching issues—were more negatively associated with entering the professoriate for women than for men. However, women were not more interested in having children than men were. Results support the hypothesis that women self-select away from academia in response to perceived systemic barriers related to parenthood. To ensure quality and equity in academia, universities should enact policy that addresses the realities of childbearing and childrearing women. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

Why the Academic Pipeline Leaks: Fewer Men than Women Perceive Barriers to Becoming Professors

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11199-004-5461-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Women are underrepresented in the professoriate compared to men; this study was designed to examine whether systemic barriers associated with parenting discourage women from pursuing academic careers. Data from 468 female and male graduate students were collected through an online questionnaire. More men than women intend to pursue academic careers. Parenting and mobility issues—but not research or teaching issues—were more negatively associated with entering the professoriate for women than for men. However, women were not more interested in having children than men were. Results support the hypothesis that women self-select away from academia in response to perceived systemic barriers related to parenthood. To ensure quality and equity in academia, universities should enact policy that addresses the realities of childbearing and childrearing women.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 4, 2004

References

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