Who is seeking whom? A person-centred approach to help-seeking in adults with currently untreated mental health problems via latent class analysis

Who is seeking whom? A person-centred approach to help-seeking in adults with currently untreated... Purpose Global surveys point to a gap in mental health service utilisation. However, contacting more than one source of professional help may influence the estimates of utilisation. Currently, few studies statistically differentiate between different sources of help based on patient characteristics. Methods We assessed sociodemographic and psychosocial data in a convenience sample of 188 adults with mental health problems (M  = 50.34 years; SD = 16.19; 71% female), who reported their help-seeking behaviour during the next 6 months. age We analysed their behaviour via latent class analysis and compared baseline characteristics between classes. Results We found four latent classes: “mental health professionals” (MHP; 9.0%), “multiple sources” (4.3%), “primary care” (35.6%), and “non-seekers” (51.1%). All classes had moderate to high probabilities of seeking help from friends or family. Primary care utilisers were more often in a cohabiting partnership; MHP utilisers were more experienced in mental health treatment and reported lower well-being and more depressive symptoms than non-seekers. By trend, non-seekers were younger, and both non-seekers and primary care utilisers reported fewer depressive and somatic symptoms than utilisers of multiple sources and MHP. Conclusions In our analysis, MHP utilisation was even lower (9.0%) than in previous studies. However, MHP utilisers appeared to suffer http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric Epidemiology Springer Journals

Who is seeking whom? A person-centred approach to help-seeking in adults with currently untreated mental health problems via latent class analysis

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Psychiatry
ISSN
0933-7954
eISSN
1433-9285
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00127-018-1537-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose Global surveys point to a gap in mental health service utilisation. However, contacting more than one source of professional help may influence the estimates of utilisation. Currently, few studies statistically differentiate between different sources of help based on patient characteristics. Methods We assessed sociodemographic and psychosocial data in a convenience sample of 188 adults with mental health problems (M  = 50.34 years; SD = 16.19; 71% female), who reported their help-seeking behaviour during the next 6 months. age We analysed their behaviour via latent class analysis and compared baseline characteristics between classes. Results We found four latent classes: “mental health professionals” (MHP; 9.0%), “multiple sources” (4.3%), “primary care” (35.6%), and “non-seekers” (51.1%). All classes had moderate to high probabilities of seeking help from friends or family. Primary care utilisers were more often in a cohabiting partnership; MHP utilisers were more experienced in mental health treatment and reported lower well-being and more depressive symptoms than non-seekers. By trend, non-seekers were younger, and both non-seekers and primary care utilisers reported fewer depressive and somatic symptoms than utilisers of multiple sources and MHP. Conclusions In our analysis, MHP utilisation was even lower (9.0%) than in previous studies. However, MHP utilisers appeared to suffer

Journal

Social Psychiatry and Psychiatric EpidemiologySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 6, 2018

References

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