When Do Environment–recruitment Correlations Work?

When Do Environment–recruitment Correlations Work? I review the role of environmental variability in the survival of juvenile fish and shellfish by examining the success of previously published environment–recruitment correlations when tested with new data. The proportion of published correlations that have been verified upon retest is low. There is one generalization that stands out: correlations for populations at the limit of a species' geographical range have often remained statistically significant when re-examined. An examination of environment–recruitment correlations that were reviewed 13 years ago by Shepherd and co-workers shows that only 1 out of 47 reviewed studies is currently used in the estimation of recruitment in routine assessments. The results suggest that future progress will require testing general hypotheses using data from many populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

When Do Environment–recruitment Correlations Work?

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 1998 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Freshwater & Marine Ecology; Zoology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1008828730759
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

I review the role of environmental variability in the survival of juvenile fish and shellfish by examining the success of previously published environment–recruitment correlations when tested with new data. The proportion of published correlations that have been verified upon retest is low. There is one generalization that stands out: correlations for populations at the limit of a species' geographical range have often remained statistically significant when re-examined. An examination of environment–recruitment correlations that were reviewed 13 years ago by Shepherd and co-workers shows that only 1 out of 47 reviewed studies is currently used in the estimation of recruitment in routine assessments. The results suggest that future progress will require testing general hypotheses using data from many populations.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 6, 2004

References

  • Alternative models of climatic effects on sockeye salmon, Oncorhynchus nerka, productivity in Bristol Bay, Alaska, and the Fraser River, British Columbia
    Adkinson, M.D.; Peterman, R.M.; Lapointe, M.F.; Gillis, D.M.; Korman, J.

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