Weak compensatory growth makes short-term starvation an unsuitable technique to mitigate body deformities of Tinca tinca juveniles in intensive culture

Weak compensatory growth makes short-term starvation an unsuitable technique to mitigate body... Juvenile tench, Tinca tinca (L.) (initial mean weight 0.67 g) were continuously fed at high (5.0% of fish biomass) or low (2.5% of fish biomass) daily doses of a commercial formulated diet, or starved for 6 days, then fed these doses. The experiment lasted 40 days. Visible skeletal deformities occurred in fish fed the high doses, and the 6-day food deprivation mitigated the percentage of deformed fish from 37.3 to 12.1%. Deformities were associated with higher condition coefficient value. Faster growing individuals were more susceptible to body malformations within the feeding groups. No compensatory growth in body weight was observed in juveniles fed high or low doses. Lack of compensation was supported by lower carbon/nitrogen ratio in starved-re-alimented fish. Morphometric indices (condition coefficient and height/length ratio) suggested only partial compensation observed mostly during the first few days after the end of starvation. The possible mechanisms underlying this weak compensatory response in T. tinca juveniles may be associated with their slow growth rate and low oxygen consumption. Short starvation mitigates body deformities in intensively fed tench juveniles, however, this technique is not recommended in aquaculture due to their weak compensatory growth response. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

Weak compensatory growth makes short-term starvation an unsuitable technique to mitigate body deformities of Tinca tinca juveniles in intensive culture

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V.
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology ; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-009-9134-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

References

  • Compensatory growth in fishes: a response to growth depression
    Ali, M; Nicieza, A; Wootton, RJ

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