‘We Like You, But We Don’t Want You’—The Impact of Pregnancy in the Workplace

‘We Like You, But We Don’t Want You’—The Impact of Pregnancy in the Workplace This study considered whether pregnant women are considered as mothers (to be) in the workplace. Working from the stereotype content model (SCM) we predicted that pregnant women would be stereotyped as warm and incompetent, and experience workplace discrimination; with these effects accentuated in masculine-type occupations. Eighty-two Australian University undergraduates evaluated a candidate who was pregnant or not for a masculine- or feminine-type short-term position. Results provided mixed support for the SCM. Across both occupations, the pregnant candidate was rated as warmer, more competent, but was discriminated against in comparison to the non-pregnant candidate. We suggest that participants may employ a shifting standard of comparison, thus highlighting a potential limitation of the usefulness of traditional SCM measures with individual targets. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Sex Roles Springer Journals

‘We Like You, But We Don’t Want You’—The Impact of Pregnancy in the Workplace

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Psychology; Gender Studies; Sociology, general; Medicine/Public Health, general
ISSN
0360-0025
eISSN
1573-2762
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11199-007-9305-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study considered whether pregnant women are considered as mothers (to be) in the workplace. Working from the stereotype content model (SCM) we predicted that pregnant women would be stereotyped as warm and incompetent, and experience workplace discrimination; with these effects accentuated in masculine-type occupations. Eighty-two Australian University undergraduates evaluated a candidate who was pregnant or not for a masculine- or feminine-type short-term position. Results provided mixed support for the SCM. Across both occupations, the pregnant candidate was rated as warmer, more competent, but was discriminated against in comparison to the non-pregnant candidate. We suggest that participants may employ a shifting standard of comparison, thus highlighting a potential limitation of the usefulness of traditional SCM measures with individual targets.

Journal

Sex RolesSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 9, 2007

References

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