Voriconazole

Voriconazole Reactions 1704, p366 - 2 Jun 2018 Agranulocytosis and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome: case report A 68-year-old woman developed voriconazole-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and agranulocytosis during treatment with voriconazole for pulmonary aspergillosis [route and dosage not stated; not all durations of treatment to reaction onsets and outcomes stated]. The woman, who had pulmonary aspergillosis, received voriconazole for 1 month. After 1 month, she suddenly developed high-grade fever, generalised rash and mild facial oedema and then visited to a hospital. She had a history of hypertension, nail lichen planus and hyperlipidaemia. The woman’s voriconazole therapy was discontinued. Despite voriconazole withdrawal for 1 week, at the second visit, the rash developed over the entire body along with exaggeration of facial oedema. The body temperature was 39.8°C. Pruritic erythema and purpura with scratching marks on her body were noted in addition to cervical, axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. Skin histology demonstrated mild liquefaction and lymphocytic infiltration with eosinophils around blood vessels. The laboratory findings revealed a drastic reduction in the WBC accompanied by agranulocytosis. Increased levels of AST and CRP were observed along with significant high serum levels of thymus and activation- regulated chemokine and soluble interleukin-2 receptor. The skin manifestation was highly suggestive of DIHS requiring hospitalisation. She was treated with prednisolone, meropenem and unspecified granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. Seven days after these treatments, her rash and fever disappeared completely. She also received treatment with piperacillin and tazobactam. The lymphocyte stimulation test with voriconazole described a significant proliferative response, suggesting that voriconazole was the culprit. Author comment: "[W]e report severe agranulocytosis in a patient with DIHS induced by voriconazole." Kaneko Y, et al. Agranulocytosis associated with voriconazole-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Journal of Dermatology 45: e118-e119, No. 5, May 2018. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.14142 - Japan 803323050 0114-9954/18/1704-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Jun 2018 No. 1704 http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reactions Weekly Springer Journals

Voriconazole

Reactions Weekly , Volume 1704 (1) – Jun 2, 2018
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Publisher
Springer International Publishing
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Drug Safety and Pharmacovigilance; Pharmacology/Toxicology
ISSN
0114-9954
eISSN
1179-2051
D.O.I.
10.1007/s40278-018-47009-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Reactions 1704, p366 - 2 Jun 2018 Agranulocytosis and drug-induced hypersensitivity syndrome: case report A 68-year-old woman developed voriconazole-induced hypersensitivity syndrome (DIHS) and agranulocytosis during treatment with voriconazole for pulmonary aspergillosis [route and dosage not stated; not all durations of treatment to reaction onsets and outcomes stated]. The woman, who had pulmonary aspergillosis, received voriconazole for 1 month. After 1 month, she suddenly developed high-grade fever, generalised rash and mild facial oedema and then visited to a hospital. She had a history of hypertension, nail lichen planus and hyperlipidaemia. The woman’s voriconazole therapy was discontinued. Despite voriconazole withdrawal for 1 week, at the second visit, the rash developed over the entire body along with exaggeration of facial oedema. The body temperature was 39.8°C. Pruritic erythema and purpura with scratching marks on her body were noted in addition to cervical, axillary and inguinal lymphadenopathy. Skin histology demonstrated mild liquefaction and lymphocytic infiltration with eosinophils around blood vessels. The laboratory findings revealed a drastic reduction in the WBC accompanied by agranulocytosis. Increased levels of AST and CRP were observed along with significant high serum levels of thymus and activation- regulated chemokine and soluble interleukin-2 receptor. The skin manifestation was highly suggestive of DIHS requiring hospitalisation. She was treated with prednisolone, meropenem and unspecified granulocyte-colony stimulating factor. Seven days after these treatments, her rash and fever disappeared completely. She also received treatment with piperacillin and tazobactam. The lymphocyte stimulation test with voriconazole described a significant proliferative response, suggesting that voriconazole was the culprit. Author comment: "[W]e report severe agranulocytosis in a patient with DIHS induced by voriconazole." Kaneko Y, et al. Agranulocytosis associated with voriconazole-induced hypersensitivity syndrome. Journal of Dermatology 45: e118-e119, No. 5, May 2018. Available from: URL: http://doi.org/10.1111/1346-8138.14142 - Japan 803323050 0114-9954/18/1704-0001/$14.95 Adis © 2018 Springer International Publishing AG. All rights reserved Reactions 2 Jun 2018 No. 1704

Journal

Reactions WeeklySpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

References

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