Virtopsy shows a high status funerary treatment in an early 18th Dynasty non-royal individual

Virtopsy shows a high status funerary treatment in an early 18th Dynasty non-royal individual This work presents the multidisciplinary investigation of the head of Nebiri (Museo Egizio, Turin S_5109), Chief of Stables, a high status elite person from the 18th Dynasty involving MDCT, 3D brain surface and facial reconstructions accompanied by a consideration of previously presented chemical analysis of the embalming materials found in fragments of bandages used on the head and viscera (lung) found in one of the four canopic jars. Comparison of the techniques used for the cosmetic treatment of Nebiri with those used in other elite and high status non-royal persons confirms the validity of the use of the term “high status elite” in the case of Nebiri. This case highlights the importance of using modern forensic techniques both to enhance new technologies of retrospective diagnosis on altered human remains and to increase knowledge of past populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png "Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology" Springer Journals

Virtopsy shows a high status funerary treatment in an early 18th Dynasty non-royal individual

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pathology; Forensic Medicine; Criminology and Criminal Justice, general
ISSN
1547-769X
eISSN
1556-2891
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12024-017-9879-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This work presents the multidisciplinary investigation of the head of Nebiri (Museo Egizio, Turin S_5109), Chief of Stables, a high status elite person from the 18th Dynasty involving MDCT, 3D brain surface and facial reconstructions accompanied by a consideration of previously presented chemical analysis of the embalming materials found in fragments of bandages used on the head and viscera (lung) found in one of the four canopic jars. Comparison of the techniques used for the cosmetic treatment of Nebiri with those used in other elite and high status non-royal persons confirms the validity of the use of the term “high status elite” in the case of Nebiri. This case highlights the importance of using modern forensic techniques both to enhance new technologies of retrospective diagnosis on altered human remains and to increase knowledge of past populations.

Journal

"Forensic Science, Medicine, and Pathology"Springer Journals

Published: Jun 7, 2017

References

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