Vicia faba plants respond to oviposition by invasive Halyomorpha halys activating direct defences against offspring

Vicia faba plants respond to oviposition by invasive Halyomorpha halys activating direct defences... The invasive stink bug Halyomorpha halys is established in many European and American agro-ecosystems, where it causes severe crop losses. Potential control measures might include enhancement of plant defences. When attacked by herbivorous insects that oviposit on it, the plant may respond by priming direct defences, which might affect the development of future brood. Halyomorpha halys attacks numerous plant species in the invaded areas. Here, we investigated whether Vicia faba plants challenged by H. halys females can impair the development of its offspring through the activation of induced direct defences. We measured the weight and dimension of nymphs that developed on oviposition-experienced plants after 7 and 17 days from hatching. Nymphs that developed on oviposition-experienced plants weighed less compared to those that developed either on control plants or on plants solely subjected to H. halys feeding, and third instars showed shorter dimensions (tibia length). In addition, when oviposition-experienced plants were attacked by nymphs, higher and more rapid expression of two jasmonic acid-dependent genes (cysteine proteinase inhibitor gene and NAI1) was detected, possibly due to a mechanism of priming. Increased expression of the salicylic acid-responsive PR1 gene was also detected in egg-experienced plants, although the response was delayed compared to JA-dependent genes. Our results suggest that V. faba plants recognize H. halys oviposition as a warning signal and pre-activate defences against future nymphal herbivory. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pest Science Springer Journals

Vicia faba plants respond to oviposition by invasive Halyomorpha halys activating direct defences against offspring

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Life Sciences; Entomology; Agriculture; Plant Pathology; Ecology; Forestry; Plant Sciences
ISSN
1612-4758
eISSN
1612-4766
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10340-018-0955-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The invasive stink bug Halyomorpha halys is established in many European and American agro-ecosystems, where it causes severe crop losses. Potential control measures might include enhancement of plant defences. When attacked by herbivorous insects that oviposit on it, the plant may respond by priming direct defences, which might affect the development of future brood. Halyomorpha halys attacks numerous plant species in the invaded areas. Here, we investigated whether Vicia faba plants challenged by H. halys females can impair the development of its offspring through the activation of induced direct defences. We measured the weight and dimension of nymphs that developed on oviposition-experienced plants after 7 and 17 days from hatching. Nymphs that developed on oviposition-experienced plants weighed less compared to those that developed either on control plants or on plants solely subjected to H. halys feeding, and third instars showed shorter dimensions (tibia length). In addition, when oviposition-experienced plants were attacked by nymphs, higher and more rapid expression of two jasmonic acid-dependent genes (cysteine proteinase inhibitor gene and NAI1) was detected, possibly due to a mechanism of priming. Increased expression of the salicylic acid-responsive PR1 gene was also detected in egg-experienced plants, although the response was delayed compared to JA-dependent genes. Our results suggest that V. faba plants recognize H. halys oviposition as a warning signal and pre-activate defences against future nymphal herbivory.

Journal

Journal of Pest ScienceSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 25, 2018

References

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