Verification of the Rigidity of the Coulomb Field in Motion

Verification of the Rigidity of the Coulomb Field in Motion Laplace, analyzing the stability of the Solar System, was the first to calculate that the velocity of the motion of force fields can significantly exceed the velocity of light waves. In electrodynamics, the Coulomb field should rigidly accompany its source for instantaneous force action in distant regions. Such rigid motion was recently inferred from experiments at the Frascati Beam Test Facility with short beams of relativistic electrons. The comments of the authors on their observations are at odds with the comments of theoreticians on retarded potentials, which motivates a detailed study of the positions of both sides. Predictions of measurements, based on the Lienard–Wiechert potentials, are used to propose an unambiguous scheme for testing the rigidity of the Coulomb field. Realization of the proposed experimental scheme could independently refute or support the assertions of the Italian physicists regarding the rigid motion of Coulomb fields and likewise the nondual field approach to macroscopic reality. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Physics Journal Springer Journals

Verification of the Rigidity of the Coulomb Field in Motion

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Physics; Physics, general; Optics, Lasers, Photonics, Optical Devices; Condensed Matter Physics; Nuclear Physics, Heavy Ions, Hadrons; Theoretical, Mathematical and Computational Physics
ISSN
1064-8887
eISSN
1573-9228
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11182-018-1403-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Laplace, analyzing the stability of the Solar System, was the first to calculate that the velocity of the motion of force fields can significantly exceed the velocity of light waves. In electrodynamics, the Coulomb field should rigidly accompany its source for instantaneous force action in distant regions. Such rigid motion was recently inferred from experiments at the Frascati Beam Test Facility with short beams of relativistic electrons. The comments of the authors on their observations are at odds with the comments of theoreticians on retarded potentials, which motivates a detailed study of the positions of both sides. Predictions of measurements, based on the Lienard–Wiechert potentials, are used to propose an unambiguous scheme for testing the rigidity of the Coulomb field. Realization of the proposed experimental scheme could independently refute or support the assertions of the Italian physicists regarding the rigid motion of Coulomb fields and likewise the nondual field approach to macroscopic reality.

Journal

Russian Physics JournalSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

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