Vegetation-permafrost relationships in the zone of sporadic permafrost distribution in the Kamchatka Peninsula

Vegetation-permafrost relationships in the zone of sporadic permafrost distribution in the... Studies on vegetation and permafrost table depth in the zone of sporadic permafrost distribution in the Uksichan River valley (the central Kamchatka Peninsula) have provided evidence that these components of biogeocenosis are interrelated and develop coordinately. In open larch forests with green forest mosses dominating in the ground vegetation layer, the permafrost table lies approximately 60 cm below the soil surface. When the ground vegetation layer is dominated by sphagnums, the permafrost table rises to 40–20 cm. In areas with a dwarf shrub-lichen ground layer, the soil thaw depth increases. A hypothesis is proposed that cyclic successional replacement of plant communities may take place in open larch forests on permafrost soils, including four consecutive stages with dominance of green mosses, sphagnums, lichens, and dwarf shrubs. In areas disturbed by fires, pioneer moss or herbaceous communities develop in the ground layer. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Ecology Springer Journals

Vegetation-permafrost relationships in the zone of sporadic permafrost distribution in the Kamchatka Peninsula

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2008 by MAIK Nauka
Subject
Life Sciences; Ecology
ISSN
1067-4136
eISSN
1608-3334
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1067413608050032
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Studies on vegetation and permafrost table depth in the zone of sporadic permafrost distribution in the Uksichan River valley (the central Kamchatka Peninsula) have provided evidence that these components of biogeocenosis are interrelated and develop coordinately. In open larch forests with green forest mosses dominating in the ground vegetation layer, the permafrost table lies approximately 60 cm below the soil surface. When the ground vegetation layer is dominated by sphagnums, the permafrost table rises to 40–20 cm. In areas with a dwarf shrub-lichen ground layer, the soil thaw depth increases. A hypothesis is proposed that cyclic successional replacement of plant communities may take place in open larch forests on permafrost soils, including four consecutive stages with dominance of green mosses, sphagnums, lichens, and dwarf shrubs. In areas disturbed by fires, pioneer moss or herbaceous communities develop in the ground layer.

Journal

Russian Journal of EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 9, 2008

References

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