Variations in the Size of Mitotic Cells in the Root Meristem

Variations in the Size of Mitotic Cells in the Root Meristem Variations in the length of mitotic and interphase cells were analyzed in various tissues of wheat roots and in the cortex of maize roots. Reliable differences were shown in the length of mitotic cells in individual file clones of cells of the same tissue. The mean lengths of dividing cells in different roots differed to a lesser extent than those of different files in the same tissue of one root. Within the file, the length of the sister simultaneously dividing cells differed the least, while the difference of lengths of the neighbor simultaneously dividing nonsister cells was bigger. The mean length of interphase cells in any file was always less than that of mitotic cells by a factor of 1.45. This ratio was almost invariable for files and tissues in both the plants we studied and corresponded to that of an exponentially growing cell population. In addition, a very small number of cells were found (less than 1%) in meristems, which are longer than the mitotic cells. The length of these cells exceeded those of mitotic cells by less than twice. The origin of such cells is discussed. The length of mitotic cells near the quiescent center is more variable than in the middle of the meristem in the cortex of both plants. In the meristem basal part, the mitotic cells were no longer than those in the middle of the meristem but there were no small dividing cells. In the wheat epidermis, the cells are differentiated into trichoblasts and atrichoblasts and, therefore, the length of the dividing cells is highly variable. The cell length is essential for their transition to mitosis for all studied proliferating meristem cells. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Developmental Biology Springer Journals

Variations in the Size of Mitotic Cells in the Root Meristem

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Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2001 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Life Sciences; Animal Anatomy / Morphology / Histology
ISSN
1062-3604
eISSN
1608-3326
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1016758900355
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Variations in the length of mitotic and interphase cells were analyzed in various tissues of wheat roots and in the cortex of maize roots. Reliable differences were shown in the length of mitotic cells in individual file clones of cells of the same tissue. The mean lengths of dividing cells in different roots differed to a lesser extent than those of different files in the same tissue of one root. Within the file, the length of the sister simultaneously dividing cells differed the least, while the difference of lengths of the neighbor simultaneously dividing nonsister cells was bigger. The mean length of interphase cells in any file was always less than that of mitotic cells by a factor of 1.45. This ratio was almost invariable for files and tissues in both the plants we studied and corresponded to that of an exponentially growing cell population. In addition, a very small number of cells were found (less than 1%) in meristems, which are longer than the mitotic cells. The length of these cells exceeded those of mitotic cells by less than twice. The origin of such cells is discussed. The length of mitotic cells near the quiescent center is more variable than in the middle of the meristem in the cortex of both plants. In the meristem basal part, the mitotic cells were no longer than those in the middle of the meristem but there were no small dividing cells. In the wheat epidermis, the cells are differentiated into trichoblasts and atrichoblasts and, therefore, the length of the dividing cells is highly variable. The cell length is essential for their transition to mitosis for all studied proliferating meristem cells.

Journal

Russian Journal of Developmental BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 9, 2004

References

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