Variability along the frontier: stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio analysis of human remains from the Late Roman–Early Byzantine cemetery site of Joan Planells, Ibiza, Spain

Variability along the frontier: stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio analysis of human... 13 15 Carbon (δ C) and nitrogen (δ N) stable isotope analysis of human bone collagen from 38 individuals was undertaken to assess diet at the Late Roman–Early Byzantine (AD 300–700) cemetery site, Joan Planells, in Ibiza, Spain. The results (δ C= − 18.7 ± 0.5‰ and δ N = 10.1 ± 1.3‰) show that the diet of this population was derived predominantly from C terrestrial resources; plant foods were likely dietary staples along with meat and/or dairy produce comprising an important component of diet. Variation in stable isotope ratio values suggests individual differences in diet. Two individuals, both males, are statistical outliers with distinctive δ N values (14.4 and 14.8‰) that point to significant consumption of marine resources. Females, on average, have higher δ C values than males. The parsimonious explanation for this observation is the greater inclusion of C resources such as millet in the diets of females. Comparison of the diet of the Joan Planells population with other Late Roman period sites on the Hispanic mainland and other parts of the Mediterranean region suggests that populations may have been responding to a combination of socio-political and environmental factors that could have included Roman influence of food http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archaeological and Anthropological Sciences Springer Journals

Variability along the frontier: stable carbon and nitrogen isotope ratio analysis of human remains from the Late Roman–Early Byzantine cemetery site of Joan Planells, Ibiza, Spain

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Earth Sciences; Earth Sciences, general; Archaeology; Chemistry/Food Science, general; Geography, general; Life Sciences, general; Anthropology
ISSN
1866-9557
eISSN
1866-9565
D.O.I.
10.1007/s12520-018-0656-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

13 15 Carbon (δ C) and nitrogen (δ N) stable isotope analysis of human bone collagen from 38 individuals was undertaken to assess diet at the Late Roman–Early Byzantine (AD 300–700) cemetery site, Joan Planells, in Ibiza, Spain. The results (δ C= − 18.7 ± 0.5‰ and δ N = 10.1 ± 1.3‰) show that the diet of this population was derived predominantly from C terrestrial resources; plant foods were likely dietary staples along with meat and/or dairy produce comprising an important component of diet. Variation in stable isotope ratio values suggests individual differences in diet. Two individuals, both males, are statistical outliers with distinctive δ N values (14.4 and 14.8‰) that point to significant consumption of marine resources. Females, on average, have higher δ C values than males. The parsimonious explanation for this observation is the greater inclusion of C resources such as millet in the diets of females. Comparison of the diet of the Joan Planells population with other Late Roman period sites on the Hispanic mainland and other parts of the Mediterranean region suggests that populations may have been responding to a combination of socio-political and environmental factors that could have included Roman influence of food

Journal

Archaeological and Anthropological SciencesSpringer Journals

Published: May 28, 2018

References

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