Utilization of simulated patients to assess diabetes and asthma counseling practices among community pharmacists in Qatar

Utilization of simulated patients to assess diabetes and asthma counseling practices among... Background Patient counseling is one of the most important services a pharmacist can provide to patients. Studies have shown that counseling provided by pharmacists may prevent medication related problems and improve adherence to medication therapy. Objective To explore counseling practices among community pharmacists using simulated patients and to determine if patient, pharmacist, and pharmacy characteristics influence the counseling provided by community pharmacists. Setting Private community pharmacies within Qatar. Method This is a randomized, cross sectional study where simulated patients visited community pharmacies and presented the pharmacist with a new prescription or requested a refill for either a diabetes or asthma medication. Pharmacists completed a questionnaire at the end of the simulated interaction, which was utilized to determine if patient, pharmacist, or pharmacy characteristics had any influence on the counseling provided to patients. A scoring system was devised to assess the pharmacist’s counseling practices. Main outcome measure To evaluate the type of information provided by community pharmacists to the simulated patient regarding diabetes and asthma. Results One hundred and twenty-nine pharmacists were enrolled in the study. Eighty one percent of pharmacists had a score <35%. Medication name (95%), directions (47%), indication (43%), and dose (41%) were the most frequently counseled components by pharmacists during the simulated interaction. Male patients received better counseling compared to the female patients (t = 6.177; p < 0.0001). Pharmacists with a master of pharmacy degree provided significantly better counseling (f = 3.261; p = 0.042). Many pharmacists (65%) provided hypoglycemia management to patients, however, 63% referred the patient to the physician when the patient experienced hypoglycemia from inappropriate medication administration. Only 2 (7%) pharmacists correctly counseled the patient on all 8 inhaler administration steps. Majority of pharmacists (50%) educated on the role of the rescue and controller therapy in asthma, however, 33% referred the patient to the physician when the patient inquired about controller therapy use. Conclusion Patient counseling was substandard with the majority of community pharmacists focusing on the name of the medication. Pharmacists rarely assessed patient’s medical history or medication use. Disease management and problem solving skills of pharmacists were suboptimal with many referring patients back to the physician. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Journal of Clinical Pharmacy Springer Journals

Utilization of simulated patients to assess diabetes and asthma counseling practices among community pharmacists in Qatar

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/utilization-of-simulated-patients-to-assess-diabetes-and-asthma-t9DIXOFXYP
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer International Publishing
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Internal Medicine; Pharmacy
ISSN
2210-7703
eISSN
2210-7711
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11096-017-0469-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Patient counseling is one of the most important services a pharmacist can provide to patients. Studies have shown that counseling provided by pharmacists may prevent medication related problems and improve adherence to medication therapy. Objective To explore counseling practices among community pharmacists using simulated patients and to determine if patient, pharmacist, and pharmacy characteristics influence the counseling provided by community pharmacists. Setting Private community pharmacies within Qatar. Method This is a randomized, cross sectional study where simulated patients visited community pharmacies and presented the pharmacist with a new prescription or requested a refill for either a diabetes or asthma medication. Pharmacists completed a questionnaire at the end of the simulated interaction, which was utilized to determine if patient, pharmacist, or pharmacy characteristics had any influence on the counseling provided to patients. A scoring system was devised to assess the pharmacist’s counseling practices. Main outcome measure To evaluate the type of information provided by community pharmacists to the simulated patient regarding diabetes and asthma. Results One hundred and twenty-nine pharmacists were enrolled in the study. Eighty one percent of pharmacists had a score <35%. Medication name (95%), directions (47%), indication (43%), and dose (41%) were the most frequently counseled components by pharmacists during the simulated interaction. Male patients received better counseling compared to the female patients (t = 6.177; p < 0.0001). Pharmacists with a master of pharmacy degree provided significantly better counseling (f = 3.261; p = 0.042). Many pharmacists (65%) provided hypoglycemia management to patients, however, 63% referred the patient to the physician when the patient experienced hypoglycemia from inappropriate medication administration. Only 2 (7%) pharmacists correctly counseled the patient on all 8 inhaler administration steps. Majority of pharmacists (50%) educated on the role of the rescue and controller therapy in asthma, however, 33% referred the patient to the physician when the patient inquired about controller therapy use. Conclusion Patient counseling was substandard with the majority of community pharmacists focusing on the name of the medication. Pharmacists rarely assessed patient’s medical history or medication use. Disease management and problem solving skills of pharmacists were suboptimal with many referring patients back to the physician.

Journal

International Journal of Clinical PharmacySpringer Journals

Published: May 2, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off