Using Progressive Time Delay to Increase Levels of Peer Imitation During Sculpting Play

Using Progressive Time Delay to Increase Levels of Peer Imitation During Sculpting Play A multiple probe across participants with an embedded withdrawal single case research design was used to examine the effectiveness of a progressive time delay (PTD) procedure to teach preschoolers with disabilities to imitate their peers during a sculpting play activity. Data indicated the presence of a functional relation between the use of PTD and contingent reinforce- ment on increased levels of peer imitation across participants; levels also decreased when PTD was withdrawn, although not to baseline levels. Overall levels of peer imitation had a greater magnitude of change than demonstrated in previous research. Keywords Imitation · Play · Small groups Introduction for maximizing learning opportunities across activities, rou- tines, and environments. Imitation is a primary mechanism by which children learn Researchers have identified effective methods for teaching new behaviors and is considered a behavioral cusp. Imita- imitation to children with disabilities, including response- tion—like other behavioral cusps (e.g., crawling for infants, prompting procedures (e.g., progressive time delay [PTD], reading for school age children)—allows a child to access graduated guidance, system of least prompts [SLP]; Gar- many previously unavailable contingencies and learning finkle and Schwartz 2002; Ledford and Wolery 2011) and opportunities and often accompanies extensive, collateral naturalistic instruction (e.g., Gazdag and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders Springer Journals

Using Progressive Time Delay to Increase Levels of Peer Imitation During Sculpting Play

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Psychology; Child and School Psychology; Pediatrics; Neurosciences; Public Health
ISSN
0162-3257
eISSN
1573-3432
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10803-018-3638-2
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A multiple probe across participants with an embedded withdrawal single case research design was used to examine the effectiveness of a progressive time delay (PTD) procedure to teach preschoolers with disabilities to imitate their peers during a sculpting play activity. Data indicated the presence of a functional relation between the use of PTD and contingent reinforce- ment on increased levels of peer imitation across participants; levels also decreased when PTD was withdrawn, although not to baseline levels. Overall levels of peer imitation had a greater magnitude of change than demonstrated in previous research. Keywords Imitation · Play · Small groups Introduction for maximizing learning opportunities across activities, rou- tines, and environments. Imitation is a primary mechanism by which children learn Researchers have identified effective methods for teaching new behaviors and is considered a behavioral cusp. Imita- imitation to children with disabilities, including response- tion—like other behavioral cusps (e.g., crawling for infants, prompting procedures (e.g., progressive time delay [PTD], reading for school age children)—allows a child to access graduated guidance, system of least prompts [SLP]; Gar- many previously unavailable contingencies and learning finkle and Schwartz 2002; Ledford and Wolery 2011) and opportunities and often accompanies extensive, collateral naturalistic instruction (e.g., Gazdag and

Journal

Journal of Autism and Developmental DisordersSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 6, 2018

References

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