Using high resolution UAV thermal imagery to assess the variability in the water status of five fruit tree species within a commercial orchard

Using high resolution UAV thermal imagery to assess the variability in the water status of five... This paper deals with the assessment of heterogeneity in water status in a commercial orchard, as a prerequisite for precision irrigation management. Remote sensing-derived indicators could be suitable for mapping water stress over large areas, and recent studies have demonstrated that high resolution airborne thermal imagery enables the assessment of discontinuous canopies as pure tree crowns can be targeted, thus eliminating the background effects. Airborne campaigns were conducted over a drip-irrigated commercial orchard in Southwestern Spain composed of five different orchard tree crops. An unmanned aerial vehicle with a thermal camera onboard was flown three times during the day on 8 July 2010, at 9, 11 and 13 h (local time). Stem water potential was measured at the same time of the flights. In some irrigation units, irrigation was stopped prior to the measurement date to induce water deficits for comparative purposes. Several approaches for using the thermal data were proposed. Daily evolution of the differential between canopy and air temperature (T c  − T a ) was compared to tree water status. The slope of the evolution of T c  − T a with time was well correlated with water status and is proposed as a novel indicator linked with the stomatal behavior. The Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) was calculated with the temperature data from the 13.00 h flight using an empirical approach for defining the upper and lower limits of T c  − T a . The assessment of variability in water status was also performed using differences in relative canopy temperatures. Ample variability was detected among and within irrigation units, demonstrating that the approach proposed was viable for precision irrigation management. The assessment led to the identification of water-stressed areas, and to the definition of threshold CWSI values and associated risks. Such thresholds may be used by growers for irrigation management based on crop developmental stages and economic considerations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Using high resolution UAV thermal imagery to assess the variability in the water status of five fruit tree species within a commercial orchard

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/using-high-resolution-uav-thermal-imagery-to-assess-the-variability-in-mTzEP1N2Xq
Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2013 by Springer Science+Business Media New York
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11119-013-9322-9
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This paper deals with the assessment of heterogeneity in water status in a commercial orchard, as a prerequisite for precision irrigation management. Remote sensing-derived indicators could be suitable for mapping water stress over large areas, and recent studies have demonstrated that high resolution airborne thermal imagery enables the assessment of discontinuous canopies as pure tree crowns can be targeted, thus eliminating the background effects. Airborne campaigns were conducted over a drip-irrigated commercial orchard in Southwestern Spain composed of five different orchard tree crops. An unmanned aerial vehicle with a thermal camera onboard was flown three times during the day on 8 July 2010, at 9, 11 and 13 h (local time). Stem water potential was measured at the same time of the flights. In some irrigation units, irrigation was stopped prior to the measurement date to induce water deficits for comparative purposes. Several approaches for using the thermal data were proposed. Daily evolution of the differential between canopy and air temperature (T c  − T a ) was compared to tree water status. The slope of the evolution of T c  − T a with time was well correlated with water status and is proposed as a novel indicator linked with the stomatal behavior. The Crop Water Stress Index (CWSI) was calculated with the temperature data from the 13.00 h flight using an empirical approach for defining the upper and lower limits of T c  − T a . The assessment of variability in water status was also performed using differences in relative canopy temperatures. Ample variability was detected among and within irrigation units, demonstrating that the approach proposed was viable for precision irrigation management. The assessment led to the identification of water-stressed areas, and to the definition of threshold CWSI values and associated risks. Such thresholds may be used by growers for irrigation management based on crop developmental stages and economic considerations.

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 15, 2013

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off