Use of the gene of antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 for producing marker-free transgenic plants

Use of the gene of antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 for producing marker-free transgenic plants The marker-free transgenic tobacco plants carrying a synthetic gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (cecP1) under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter were produced. The binary vector pBM, free of any selective genes of resistance to antibiotics or herbicides intended for selecting transgenic plants, was used for transformation. The transformants were screened on a nonselective medium by detecting cecropin P1 in plant cells according to the antibacterial activity of plant extracts and enzyme immunoassay. According to the two used methods, 2% of the analyzed regenerants were transformants. The resulting marker-free plants displayed a considerably increased resistance to microbial phytopathogens—the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Thus, the gene cecP1 can be concurrently used as a target gene and a screening marker. The utility of cecP1 as a selective gene for direct selection of transformed plants is discussed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Use of the gene of antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 for producing marker-free transgenic plants

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Publisher
SP MAIK Nauka/Interperiodica
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Pleiades Publishing, Ltd.
Subject
Biomedicine; Microbial Genetics and Genomics; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1134/S1022795409080067
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The marker-free transgenic tobacco plants carrying a synthetic gene encoding the antimicrobial peptide cecropin P1 (cecP1) under the control of the cauliflower mosaic virus 35S RNA promoter were produced. The binary vector pBM, free of any selective genes of resistance to antibiotics or herbicides intended for selecting transgenic plants, was used for transformation. The transformants were screened on a nonselective medium by detecting cecropin P1 in plant cells according to the antibacterial activity of plant extracts and enzyme immunoassay. According to the two used methods, 2% of the analyzed regenerants were transformants. The resulting marker-free plants displayed a considerably increased resistance to microbial phytopathogens—the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and fungus Sclerotinia sclerotiorum. Thus, the gene cecP1 can be concurrently used as a target gene and a screening marker. The utility of cecP1 as a selective gene for direct selection of transformed plants is discussed.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Aug 25, 2009

References

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