Use of PROs in Primary Care: PROMIS or Disappointment?

Use of PROs in Primary Care: PROMIS or Disappointment? JGIM EDITORIAL AND COMMENT Elizabeth R. Pfoh, PhD, MPH and Michael B. Rothberg, MD, MPH Center for Value-Based Care Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. J Gen Intern Med 33(8):1207–8 difficult to treat. While interviewing the clinicians could an- DOI: 10.1007/s11606-018-4511-x swer these questions definitively, some insight can be gleaned © Society of General Internal Medicine 2018 from the clinicians’ actions and interviews with the patients. The first explanation seems unlikely because according to the patients, the vast majority of threshold symptoms were n 2004, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched its 3 discussed. Patients also reported that clinicians often priori- Roadmap as a way to transform healthcare research by tized other diseases. In fact, the most common reason for not making it more efficient. PROMIS (the Patient-Reported discussing the SPADE symptom was a more pressing medical Outcomes Measurement System) was developed as part of issue (49%). Finally, many patients reported not needing the Roadmap to fill the need for an evidenced-based, state- (47%) or wanting (29%) treatment. Yet, treatment was desired of-the-art assessment system for measuring self-reported the majority of the time when symptoms were threshold level health. PROMIS standardizes collection of patient-reported for pain, sleep, and http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of General Internal Medicine Springer Journals

Use of PROs in Primary Care: PROMIS or Disappointment?

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Society of General Internal Medicine
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Internal Medicine
ISSN
0884-8734
eISSN
1525-1497
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11606-018-4511-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

JGIM EDITORIAL AND COMMENT Elizabeth R. Pfoh, PhD, MPH and Michael B. Rothberg, MD, MPH Center for Value-Based Care Research, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA. J Gen Intern Med 33(8):1207–8 difficult to treat. While interviewing the clinicians could an- DOI: 10.1007/s11606-018-4511-x swer these questions definitively, some insight can be gleaned © Society of General Internal Medicine 2018 from the clinicians’ actions and interviews with the patients. The first explanation seems unlikely because according to the patients, the vast majority of threshold symptoms were n 2004, the National Institutes of Health (NIH) launched its 3 discussed. Patients also reported that clinicians often priori- Roadmap as a way to transform healthcare research by tized other diseases. In fact, the most common reason for not making it more efficient. PROMIS (the Patient-Reported discussing the SPADE symptom was a more pressing medical Outcomes Measurement System) was developed as part of issue (49%). Finally, many patients reported not needing the Roadmap to fill the need for an evidenced-based, state- (47%) or wanting (29%) treatment. Yet, treatment was desired of-the-art assessment system for measuring self-reported the majority of the time when symptoms were threshold level health. PROMIS standardizes collection of patient-reported for pain, sleep, and

Journal

Journal of General Internal MedicineSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 5, 2018

References

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