Use of hyperspectral data to assess the effects of different nitrogen applications on a potato crop

Use of hyperspectral data to assess the effects of different nitrogen applications on a potato crop This study was conducted to explore whether hyperspectral data could be used to discriminate between the effects of different rates of nitrogen application to a potato crop. The field experiment was carried out in the Central Potato Research Station, Jalandhar, on seven plots with different nitrogen (N) treatments. Spectral reflectance was measured using a 512-channel spectroradiometer with a range of 395–1075 nm on two different dates during crop growth. An optimum number of bands were selected from this range based on band–band r 2, principal component analysis and discriminant analysis. The four bands that could discriminate between the rates of N applied were 560, 650, 730, and 760 nm. An ANOVA analysis of several narrow-band indices calculated from the reflectance values showed the indices that were able to differentiate best between the different rates of N application. These were reflectance ratio at the red edge (R740/720) and the structure insensitive pigment index (SIPI). To estimate leaf N, reflectance ratios were determined for each band combination and were evaluated for their correlation with the leaf N content. A regression model for N estimation was obtained using the reflectance ratio indices at 750 and 710 nm wavelengths (F-ratio = 32 and r 2 = 0.551, P < 0.000). http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Precision Agriculture Springer Journals

Use of hyperspectral data to assess the effects of different nitrogen applications on a potato crop

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2007 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Life Sciences; Agriculture; Soil Science & Conservation; Remote Sensing/Photogrammetry; Statistics for Engineering, Physics, Computer Science, Chemistry and Earth Sciences; Atmospheric Sciences
ISSN
1385-2256
eISSN
1573-1618
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11119-007-9042-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study was conducted to explore whether hyperspectral data could be used to discriminate between the effects of different rates of nitrogen application to a potato crop. The field experiment was carried out in the Central Potato Research Station, Jalandhar, on seven plots with different nitrogen (N) treatments. Spectral reflectance was measured using a 512-channel spectroradiometer with a range of 395–1075 nm on two different dates during crop growth. An optimum number of bands were selected from this range based on band–band r 2, principal component analysis and discriminant analysis. The four bands that could discriminate between the rates of N applied were 560, 650, 730, and 760 nm. An ANOVA analysis of several narrow-band indices calculated from the reflectance values showed the indices that were able to differentiate best between the different rates of N application. These were reflectance ratio at the red edge (R740/720) and the structure insensitive pigment index (SIPI). To estimate leaf N, reflectance ratios were determined for each band combination and were evaluated for their correlation with the leaf N content. A regression model for N estimation was obtained using the reflectance ratio indices at 750 and 710 nm wavelengths (F-ratio = 32 and r 2 = 0.551, P < 0.000).

Journal

Precision AgricultureSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 28, 2007

References

  • Comparing prediction power and stability of broadband and hyperspectral vegetation indices for estimation of green leaf area index and canopy chlorophyll density
    Broge, N. H.; Leblanc, E.
  • Estimating corn leaf chlorophyll concentration from leaf and canopy reflectance
    Daughtry, C. H. T.; Walthall, C. L.; Kim, M. S.; Colstoun, E. B.; Mc-Murtrey, J. E.
  • Comparison of broad-band and narrow-band red and near-infrared vegetation indices
    Elvidge, C. D.; Chen, Z.

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