Urinary stone risk factors in the descendants of patients with kidney stone disease

Urinary stone risk factors in the descendants of patients with kidney stone disease Background Evidence has indicated that immediate family members of nephrolithiasis patients had high opportunity to develop stones. However, they are usually not regarded to be at risk, since it is unclear if there are any lithogenic abnormalities found in non-stone-forming nephrolithiasis relatives. Our aim was to investigate urinary metabolic abnormalities in the children of nephrolithiasis patients, compared with the general population. Methods The 24-h urinary metabolic profile was studied for 28 calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis patients (NL) and 46 of their descendants (ND), as well as 40 non-stone-forming volunteers (V) and 34 of their descendants (VD). Results There was no difference between age, gender, and serum creatinine between NL vs. V (parental groups) and ND vs. VD (descendant groups). High urinary oxalate in nephrolithiasis and urinary calcium in their descendants was detected. In addition, an elevated urinary excretion rate of calcium, phosphate, protein, and albumin, along with low citrate excretion and high urinary supersaturation was observed in both the nephrolithiasis patients and their descendants. Approximate 17.8–24.4% of the nephrolithiasis descendants had a urinary supersaturation higher than the nephrolithiasis level, but none was found in VD group. The level of urinary supersaturation index was correlated with urinary protein and albumin excretion http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Pediatric Nephrology Springer Journals

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by IPNA
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Pediatrics; Nephrology; Urology
ISSN
0931-041X
eISSN
1432-198X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00467-018-3927-1
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Background Evidence has indicated that immediate family members of nephrolithiasis patients had high opportunity to develop stones. However, they are usually not regarded to be at risk, since it is unclear if there are any lithogenic abnormalities found in non-stone-forming nephrolithiasis relatives. Our aim was to investigate urinary metabolic abnormalities in the children of nephrolithiasis patients, compared with the general population. Methods The 24-h urinary metabolic profile was studied for 28 calcium oxalate nephrolithiasis patients (NL) and 46 of their descendants (ND), as well as 40 non-stone-forming volunteers (V) and 34 of their descendants (VD). Results There was no difference between age, gender, and serum creatinine between NL vs. V (parental groups) and ND vs. VD (descendant groups). High urinary oxalate in nephrolithiasis and urinary calcium in their descendants was detected. In addition, an elevated urinary excretion rate of calcium, phosphate, protein, and albumin, along with low citrate excretion and high urinary supersaturation was observed in both the nephrolithiasis patients and their descendants. Approximate 17.8–24.4% of the nephrolithiasis descendants had a urinary supersaturation higher than the nephrolithiasis level, but none was found in VD group. The level of urinary supersaturation index was correlated with urinary protein and albumin excretion

Journal

Pediatric NephrologySpringer Journals

Published: Mar 28, 2018

References

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