Urban Households’ Cooking Oil and Fat Consumption Patterns in Turkey: Quality Vs. Quantity

Urban Households’ Cooking Oil and Fat Consumption Patterns in Turkey: Quality Vs. Quantity This article investigates households’ cooking oil and fat consumption patterns in Turkey using data from household budget surveys. The almost ideal demand system was employed to analyze demand parameters and elasticities for major five types of oil. Prices were adjusted for quality and the demographic translation method was used to incorporate to demographic variables. Finally, the two stage generalized demand model was used to take into account censory of the dependent variable. Results showed that higher-income and higher-educated consumers consume more quality and healthy oil such as olive oil than lower-income and less educated consumers. According to income elasticities, lower-income consumers are more sensitive to income changes compare to higher-income consumers. Moreover, lower-income consumers are more prices sensitive to olive oil and corn oil than are higher-income consumers. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Quality & Quantity Springer Journals

Urban Households’ Cooking Oil and Fat Consumption Patterns in Turkey: Quality Vs. Quantity

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2006 by Springer
Subject
Social Sciences; Methodology of the Social Sciences; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
0033-5177
eISSN
1573-7845
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11135-006-9029-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This article investigates households’ cooking oil and fat consumption patterns in Turkey using data from household budget surveys. The almost ideal demand system was employed to analyze demand parameters and elasticities for major five types of oil. Prices were adjusted for quality and the demographic translation method was used to incorporate to demographic variables. Finally, the two stage generalized demand model was used to take into account censory of the dependent variable. Results showed that higher-income and higher-educated consumers consume more quality and healthy oil such as olive oil than lower-income and less educated consumers. According to income elasticities, lower-income consumers are more sensitive to income changes compare to higher-income consumers. Moreover, lower-income consumers are more prices sensitive to olive oil and corn oil than are higher-income consumers.

Journal

Quality & QuantitySpringer Journals

Published: Sep 14, 2006

References

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