Uptake of PAHs by cabbage root and leaf in vegetable plots near a large coking manufacturer and associations with PAHs in cabbage core

Uptake of PAHs by cabbage root and leaf in vegetable plots near a large coking manufacturer and... Samples of ambient air (including gaseous and particulate phases), dust fall, surface soil, rhizosphere soil, core (edible part), outer leaf, and root of cabbage from eight vegetable plots near a large coking manufacturer were collected during the harvest period. Concentrations, compositions, and distributions of parent PAHs in different samples were determined. Our results indicated that most of the parent PAHs in air occurred in the gaseous phase, dominated by low molecular weight (LMW) species with two to three rings. Specific isomeric ratios and principal component analysis were employed to preliminarily identify the local sources of parent PAHs emitted. The main emission sources of parent PAHs could be apportioned as a mixture of coal combustion, coking production, and traffic tailing gas. PAH components with two to four rings were prevailing in dust fall, surface soil, and rhizosphere soil. Concentrations of PAHs in surface soil exhibited a significant positive correlation with topsoil TOC fractions. Compositional profiles in outer leaf and core of cabbage, dominated by LMW species, were similar to those in the local air. Overall, the order of parent PAH concentration in cabbage was outer leaf > root > core. Partial correlation analysis and multivariate linear stepwise regression revealed that PAH concentrations in cabbage core were closely associated with PAHs present both in root and in outer leaf, namely, affected by adsorption, then absorption, and translocation of PAHs from rhizosphere soil and ambient air, respectively. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Environmental Science and Pollution Research Springer Journals

Uptake of PAHs by cabbage root and leaf in vegetable plots near a large coking manufacturer and associations with PAHs in cabbage core

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Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany
Subject
Environment; Environment, general; Environmental Chemistry; Ecotoxicology; Environmental Health; Atmospheric Protection/Air Quality Control/Air Pollution; Waste Water Technology / Water Pollution Control / Water Management / Aquatic Pollution
ISSN
0944-1344
eISSN
1614-7499
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11356-017-9548-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Samples of ambient air (including gaseous and particulate phases), dust fall, surface soil, rhizosphere soil, core (edible part), outer leaf, and root of cabbage from eight vegetable plots near a large coking manufacturer were collected during the harvest period. Concentrations, compositions, and distributions of parent PAHs in different samples were determined. Our results indicated that most of the parent PAHs in air occurred in the gaseous phase, dominated by low molecular weight (LMW) species with two to three rings. Specific isomeric ratios and principal component analysis were employed to preliminarily identify the local sources of parent PAHs emitted. The main emission sources of parent PAHs could be apportioned as a mixture of coal combustion, coking production, and traffic tailing gas. PAH components with two to four rings were prevailing in dust fall, surface soil, and rhizosphere soil. Concentrations of PAHs in surface soil exhibited a significant positive correlation with topsoil TOC fractions. Compositional profiles in outer leaf and core of cabbage, dominated by LMW species, were similar to those in the local air. Overall, the order of parent PAH concentration in cabbage was outer leaf > root > core. Partial correlation analysis and multivariate linear stepwise regression revealed that PAH concentrations in cabbage core were closely associated with PAHs present both in root and in outer leaf, namely, affected by adsorption, then absorption, and translocation of PAHs from rhizosphere soil and ambient air, respectively.

Journal

Environmental Science and Pollution ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 27, 2017

References

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