Unveiling the demographic ‘action’ in class-action lawsuits: Two instructional cases

Unveiling the demographic ‘action’ in class-action lawsuits: Two instructional cases Population turnover, cohort survival, and intercohort transmission of effects are concepts widely applicable beyond the customary domains of demographic analysis. One such application involves a cohort of victims referenced in time and place by a common harm for which legal redress is sought through a class-action lawsuit. Two instructional case studies illustrate applications of demographic reasoning and data to certain generic questions such litigation may pose: How many claimants will remain by some future date? How prevalent will they then be in the population? How feasible will it be to redress the harm years later? These cases illustrate the use of familiar demographic concepts and simple demographic reasoning to draw legally relevant conclusions from available data. Specific instructional applications include: accounting for demographic factors that deplete the original class over time and dilute its surviving members among residents at the referenced place; integrating the use of administrative record, census, and vital statistics data; and devising approximate estimates of turnover within local populations. Training is broadly suited to assignments aimed at applying common-sense demographic reasoning to devise nonstandard solutions to measurement problems. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Population Research and Policy Review Springer Journals

Unveiling the demographic ‘action’ in class-action lawsuits: Two instructional cases

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 1999 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Geography; Demography; Economic Policy; Population Economics
ISSN
0167-5923
eISSN
1573-7829
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1006381629603
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Population turnover, cohort survival, and intercohort transmission of effects are concepts widely applicable beyond the customary domains of demographic analysis. One such application involves a cohort of victims referenced in time and place by a common harm for which legal redress is sought through a class-action lawsuit. Two instructional case studies illustrate applications of demographic reasoning and data to certain generic questions such litigation may pose: How many claimants will remain by some future date? How prevalent will they then be in the population? How feasible will it be to redress the harm years later? These cases illustrate the use of familiar demographic concepts and simple demographic reasoning to draw legally relevant conclusions from available data. Specific instructional applications include: accounting for demographic factors that deplete the original class over time and dilute its surviving members among residents at the referenced place; integrating the use of administrative record, census, and vital statistics data; and devising approximate estimates of turnover within local populations. Training is broadly suited to assignments aimed at applying common-sense demographic reasoning to devise nonstandard solutions to measurement problems.

Journal

Population Research and Policy ReviewSpringer Journals

Published: Sep 28, 2004

References

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