Understanding Sexual Partner Preference: from Biological Diversity to Psychiatric Disorders

Understanding Sexual Partner Preference: from Biological Diversity to Psychiatric Disorders Purpose of Review The aim of this review is to provide current evidence on the biological and psychological mechanisms that underlie sexual partner preferences (SPP) in humans and animals. Recent Findings SPP depend mainly on prenatal (adaptive) organization of the brain, but can be drastically modified via learning under enhanced dopaminergic (DA) and oxytocinergic (OT) activity. Summary SPP can be categorized as in those directed towards partners who display indicators of biological fitness (IBF) or towards partners who do not show those indicators. The IBF function as unconditioned stimuli that presumably activate prenatally organized brain areas that mediate the salience of those stimuli. However, we discuss some evidence indicating that SPP not directed towards IBF (i.e., paraphilias) might be consequence of a learning process that occurs under enhanced DA or OT activity, resulting in new powerful learning with additional brain areas involved. . . . . . Keywords Paraphilia Sexual partner preference Brain Learning Pedophilia Homosexual Very few ever fully appreciate the powerful influence that have been shaped throughout evolution, such that most which sexuality exercises over feeling, thought, and mature individuals will display a sexual preference for sexu- conduct, both in the individual and in society. ally mature http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Current Sexual Health Reports Springer Journals

Understanding Sexual Partner Preference: from Biological Diversity to Psychiatric Disorders

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Urology; Endocrinology
ISSN
1548-3584
eISSN
1548-3592
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11930-018-0152-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Purpose of Review The aim of this review is to provide current evidence on the biological and psychological mechanisms that underlie sexual partner preferences (SPP) in humans and animals. Recent Findings SPP depend mainly on prenatal (adaptive) organization of the brain, but can be drastically modified via learning under enhanced dopaminergic (DA) and oxytocinergic (OT) activity. Summary SPP can be categorized as in those directed towards partners who display indicators of biological fitness (IBF) or towards partners who do not show those indicators. The IBF function as unconditioned stimuli that presumably activate prenatally organized brain areas that mediate the salience of those stimuli. However, we discuss some evidence indicating that SPP not directed towards IBF (i.e., paraphilias) might be consequence of a learning process that occurs under enhanced DA or OT activity, resulting in new powerful learning with additional brain areas involved. . . . . . Keywords Paraphilia Sexual partner preference Brain Learning Pedophilia Homosexual Very few ever fully appreciate the powerful influence that have been shaped throughout evolution, such that most which sexuality exercises over feeling, thought, and mature individuals will display a sexual preference for sexu- conduct, both in the individual and in society. ally mature

Journal

Current Sexual Health ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 2, 2018

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