Underestimation of large distances in active and passive locomotion

Underestimation of large distances in active and passive locomotion Our ability to estimate distances, be it verbally or by locomotion, is exquisite at close range (action space). At distances above 100 m (vista space), verbal estimates continue to be quite accurate, whereas locomotor estimates have been found to be grossly underestimated. Until now, however, the latter have been performed on a treadmill, which might not translate to real-world walking. We investigated if the motor underestimation found on the treadmill holds up in a natural environment. Observers viewed pictures of objects at distances between 10 and 245 m and were asked to reproduce these distances in a blindfolded walking task (using passive movement or an active production method). Active and passive locomotor judgments underestimated far distances above 100 m. We conclude that underestimation of large distances does not depend on the medium (treadmill vs. real-world) but rather on the sensory modality and effort involved in the task. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Experimental Brain Research Springer Journals

Underestimation of large distances in active and passive locomotion

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/underestimation-of-large-distances-in-active-and-passive-locomotion-DM2wupopIm
Publisher
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Germany, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Biomedicine; Neurosciences; Neurology
ISSN
0014-4819
eISSN
1432-1106
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00221-018-5245-z
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Our ability to estimate distances, be it verbally or by locomotion, is exquisite at close range (action space). At distances above 100 m (vista space), verbal estimates continue to be quite accurate, whereas locomotor estimates have been found to be grossly underestimated. Until now, however, the latter have been performed on a treadmill, which might not translate to real-world walking. We investigated if the motor underestimation found on the treadmill holds up in a natural environment. Observers viewed pictures of objects at distances between 10 and 245 m and were asked to reproduce these distances in a blindfolded walking task (using passive movement or an active production method). Active and passive locomotor judgments underestimated far distances above 100 m. We conclude that underestimation of large distances does not depend on the medium (treadmill vs. real-world) but rather on the sensory modality and effort involved in the task.

Journal

Experimental Brain ResearchSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 26, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off