Twenty years since the discovery of the parkin gene

Twenty years since the discovery of the parkin gene Nearly 20 years have passed since we identified the causative gene for a familial Parkinson’s disease, parkin (now known as PARK2), in 1998. PARK2 is the most common gene responsible for young-onset Parkinson’s disease. It codes for the protein Parkin RBR E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase (PARK2), which directly links to the ubiquitin-proteasome as a ubiquitin ligase. PARK2 is involved in mitophagy, which is a type of autophagy, in collaboration with PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). The PINK1 gene (previously known as PARK6) is also a causative gene for young-onset Parkinson’s disease. Both gene products may be involved in regulating quality control within the mitochondria. The discovery of PARK2 as a cause of young-onset Parkinson’s disease has had a major impact on other neurodegenerative diseases. The involvement of protein degradation systems has been implicated as a common mechanism for neurodegenerative diseases in which inclusion body formation is observed. The discovery of the involvement of PARK2 in Parkinson’s disease focused attention on the involvement of protein degradation systems in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the history of the discovery of PARK2, the clinical phenotypes of patients with PARK2 mutations, and its functional roles. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Neural Transmission Springer Journals

Twenty years since the discovery of the parkin gene

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Publisher
Springer Vienna
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer-Verlag GmbH Austria
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Neurology; Psychiatry; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Neurosciences
ISSN
0300-9564
eISSN
1435-1463
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00702-017-1742-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Nearly 20 years have passed since we identified the causative gene for a familial Parkinson’s disease, parkin (now known as PARK2), in 1998. PARK2 is the most common gene responsible for young-onset Parkinson’s disease. It codes for the protein Parkin RBR E3 ubiquitin-protein ligase (PARK2), which directly links to the ubiquitin-proteasome as a ubiquitin ligase. PARK2 is involved in mitophagy, which is a type of autophagy, in collaboration with PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1). The PINK1 gene (previously known as PARK6) is also a causative gene for young-onset Parkinson’s disease. Both gene products may be involved in regulating quality control within the mitochondria. The discovery of PARK2 as a cause of young-onset Parkinson’s disease has had a major impact on other neurodegenerative diseases. The involvement of protein degradation systems has been implicated as a common mechanism for neurodegenerative diseases in which inclusion body formation is observed. The discovery of the involvement of PARK2 in Parkinson’s disease focused attention on the involvement of protein degradation systems in neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, we focus on the history of the discovery of PARK2, the clinical phenotypes of patients with PARK2 mutations, and its functional roles.

Journal

Journal of Neural TransmissionSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 15, 2017

References

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