Trend and risk factors of low birth weight and macrosomia in south China, 2005–2017: a retrospective observational study

Trend and risk factors of low birth weight and macrosomia in south China, 2005–2017: a... The percentages of low birth weight (LBW) increased from 7.7% in 2005 to 11.3% in 2011 and declined to 8.1% in 2017. For very low birth weight (VLBW) individuals, the proportion declined −1.0% annually, from 2.5% in 2005 to 1.4% in 2017. Among moderately low birth weight (MLBW) individuals, the proportion first increased 12.8% annually, from 5.0% in 2005 to 9.3% in 2011, and then declined −3.8% annually, from 9.4% in 2011 to 7.0% in 2017. The percentages of macrosomia monotone decreased from 4.0% in 2005 to 2.5% in 2017, an annual decline of −4.0%. Multiple regression analyses showed that boys, maternal age, hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy (HDCP), and diabetes were significant risk factors for LBW. Boys, maternal age, gestational age, HDCP, diabetes, and maternal BMI were significant risk factors for macrosomia. Although the relevant figures declined slightly in our study, it is likely that LBW and macrosomia will remain a major public health issue over the next few years in China. More research aimed at control and prevention of these risk factors for LBW and macrosomia and their detrimental outcome in the mother and perinatal child should be performed in China. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Scientific Reports Springer Journals

Trend and risk factors of low birth weight and macrosomia in south China, 2005–2017: a retrospective observational study

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Publisher
Nature Publishing Group UK
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by The Author(s)
Subject
Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, Humanities and Social Sciences, multidisciplinary; Science, multidisciplinary
eISSN
2045-2322
D.O.I.
10.1038/s41598-018-21771-6
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The percentages of low birth weight (LBW) increased from 7.7% in 2005 to 11.3% in 2011 and declined to 8.1% in 2017. For very low birth weight (VLBW) individuals, the proportion declined −1.0% annually, from 2.5% in 2005 to 1.4% in 2017. Among moderately low birth weight (MLBW) individuals, the proportion first increased 12.8% annually, from 5.0% in 2005 to 9.3% in 2011, and then declined −3.8% annually, from 9.4% in 2011 to 7.0% in 2017. The percentages of macrosomia monotone decreased from 4.0% in 2005 to 2.5% in 2017, an annual decline of −4.0%. Multiple regression analyses showed that boys, maternal age, hypertensive disorders complicating pregnancy (HDCP), and diabetes were significant risk factors for LBW. Boys, maternal age, gestational age, HDCP, diabetes, and maternal BMI were significant risk factors for macrosomia. Although the relevant figures declined slightly in our study, it is likely that LBW and macrosomia will remain a major public health issue over the next few years in China. More research aimed at control and prevention of these risk factors for LBW and macrosomia and their detrimental outcome in the mother and perinatal child should be performed in China.

Journal

Scientific ReportsSpringer Journals

Published: Feb 21, 2018

References

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