Treatment dose and the elimination rates of electrolytes, vitamins, and trace elements during continuous veno-venous hemodialysis (CVVHD)

Treatment dose and the elimination rates of electrolytes, vitamins, and trace elements during... Introduction During continuous renal replacement therapy, achievement of recommended treatment dose is important. However, relevant substrate loss may occur and recommended nutrition during critical illness could not be sufficient for higher dialysis doses. We investigated the correlation of dialysis dose and substrate loss for a broad range of dialysis doses. Methods Forty critically ill patients with acute kidney injury undergoing citrate CVVHD were included in this prospec- tive study. Three different corresponding blood flow (BF) and dialysate flow (DF) rates were applied (BF/DF: 100 ml/min, 2000 ml/h; 80 ml/min, 1500 ml/h; 120 ml/min, 2500 ml/h). Delivered effluent flow rate (DEFR) was calculated and correlated with losses of vitamins, electrolytes, and trace elements during recommended nutritional supplementation. Results For folic acid, vitamin B12, zinc, inorganic phosphate, and magnesium, no correlation of losses and DEFR was detected. For ionized calcium, a correlation was observed and additional substitution was required. Conclusion Clinically relevant loss of folic acid, vitamin B12, zinc, inorganic phosphate, and magnesium was not observed for differently used dialysis doses of CVVHD, and the loss was covered sufficiently by daily recommended nutritional sup - plementation. Increased loss of ionized calcium for higher dialysis doses occurred during citrate CVVHD. Therefore, a strict protocol must maintain calcium homeostasis http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png International Urology and Nephrology Springer Journals

Treatment dose and the elimination rates of electrolytes, vitamins, and trace elements during continuous veno-venous hemodialysis (CVVHD)

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Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Medicine & Public Health; Nephrology; Urology
ISSN
0301-1623
eISSN
1573-2584
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11255-018-1856-3
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Introduction During continuous renal replacement therapy, achievement of recommended treatment dose is important. However, relevant substrate loss may occur and recommended nutrition during critical illness could not be sufficient for higher dialysis doses. We investigated the correlation of dialysis dose and substrate loss for a broad range of dialysis doses. Methods Forty critically ill patients with acute kidney injury undergoing citrate CVVHD were included in this prospec- tive study. Three different corresponding blood flow (BF) and dialysate flow (DF) rates were applied (BF/DF: 100 ml/min, 2000 ml/h; 80 ml/min, 1500 ml/h; 120 ml/min, 2500 ml/h). Delivered effluent flow rate (DEFR) was calculated and correlated with losses of vitamins, electrolytes, and trace elements during recommended nutritional supplementation. Results For folic acid, vitamin B12, zinc, inorganic phosphate, and magnesium, no correlation of losses and DEFR was detected. For ionized calcium, a correlation was observed and additional substitution was required. Conclusion Clinically relevant loss of folic acid, vitamin B12, zinc, inorganic phosphate, and magnesium was not observed for differently used dialysis doses of CVVHD, and the loss was covered sufficiently by daily recommended nutritional sup - plementation. Increased loss of ionized calcium for higher dialysis doses occurred during citrate CVVHD. Therefore, a strict protocol must maintain calcium homeostasis

Journal

International Urology and NephrologySpringer Journals

Published: Apr 2, 2018

References

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