Transposition as a Way of Existence: Phage Mu

Transposition as a Way of Existence: Phage Mu Transposition is a special mode of DNA recombination that produces a transfer of a DNA segment (transposable element, TE) from one chromosome region to a nonhomologous genomic loci. Bacterial TEs have chosen two principal strategies of their movement within and among genomes: conservative transposition (resulting in a simple insertion) and/or replicative transposition (accompanied by complete DNA replication and producing a cointegrate). Variations of transposition strategies concern the number and nature of cuts that sever the transposon from the flanking donor DNA: one-strand break (phage Mu) or double-strand breaks (Tn7, IS10 and members of IS3 family) and the possibility of accompanying TE replication, which leads to different end-products of transposition. Phage Mu combines properties of a temperate phage and a transposable element. Among transposons, it is studied in most detail. As a transposable element phage Mu is remarkable because its lifecycle involves two transposition modes: nonreplicative resulting in lysogeny and replicative leading to multiple copying of phage DNA during the lytic growth. There are several levels of transcription regulation (or choice of developmental pathway). The genetic transposition reaction mediated by phage Mu A transposase Mu A in the transpososome complex involves elaborate protein–nucleic acid and protein–protein interactions. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Russian Journal of Genetics Springer Journals

Transposition as a Way of Existence: Phage Mu

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/transposition-as-a-way-of-existence-phage-mu-H1pv48LOdc
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers-Plenum Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2003 by MAIK “Nauka/Interperiodica”
Subject
Biomedicine; Human Genetics
ISSN
1022-7954
eISSN
1608-3369
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1023779500021
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Transposition is a special mode of DNA recombination that produces a transfer of a DNA segment (transposable element, TE) from one chromosome region to a nonhomologous genomic loci. Bacterial TEs have chosen two principal strategies of their movement within and among genomes: conservative transposition (resulting in a simple insertion) and/or replicative transposition (accompanied by complete DNA replication and producing a cointegrate). Variations of transposition strategies concern the number and nature of cuts that sever the transposon from the flanking donor DNA: one-strand break (phage Mu) or double-strand breaks (Tn7, IS10 and members of IS3 family) and the possibility of accompanying TE replication, which leads to different end-products of transposition. Phage Mu combines properties of a temperate phage and a transposable element. Among transposons, it is studied in most detail. As a transposable element phage Mu is remarkable because its lifecycle involves two transposition modes: nonreplicative resulting in lysogeny and replicative leading to multiple copying of phage DNA during the lytic growth. There are several levels of transcription regulation (or choice of developmental pathway). The genetic transposition reaction mediated by phage Mu A transposase Mu A in the transpososome complex involves elaborate protein–nucleic acid and protein–protein interactions.

Journal

Russian Journal of GeneticsSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 7, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off