Transposable element contributions to plant gene and genome evolution

Transposable element contributions to plant gene and genome evolution Transposable elements were first discovered in plants because they can have tremendous effects on genome structure and gene function. Although only a few or no elements may be active within a genome at any time in any individual, the genomic alterations they cause can have major outcomes for a species. All major element types appear to be present in all plant species, but their quantitative and qualitative contributions are enormously variable even between closely related lineages. In some large-genome plants, mobile DNAs make up the majority of the nuclear genome. They can rearrange genomes and alter individual gene structure and regulation through any of the activities they promote: transposition, insertion, excision, chromosome breakage, and ectopic recombination. Many genes may have been assembled or amplified through the action of transposable elements, and it is likely that most plant genes contain legacies of multiple transposable element insertions into promoters. Because chromosomal rearrangements can lead to speciating infertility in heterozygous progeny, transposable elements may be responsible for the rate at which such incompatibility is generated in separated populations. For these reasons, understanding plant gene and genome evolution is only possible if we comprehend the contributions of transposable elements. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Plant Molecular Biology Springer Journals

Transposable element contributions to plant gene and genome evolution

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/transposable-element-contributions-to-plant-gene-and-genome-evolution-5xLNhUpn5o
Publisher
Kluwer Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2000 by Kluwer Academic Publishers
Subject
Life Sciences; Biochemistry, general; Plant Sciences; Plant Pathology
ISSN
0167-4412
eISSN
1573-5028
D.O.I.
10.1023/A:1006344508454
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Transposable elements were first discovered in plants because they can have tremendous effects on genome structure and gene function. Although only a few or no elements may be active within a genome at any time in any individual, the genomic alterations they cause can have major outcomes for a species. All major element types appear to be present in all plant species, but their quantitative and qualitative contributions are enormously variable even between closely related lineages. In some large-genome plants, mobile DNAs make up the majority of the nuclear genome. They can rearrange genomes and alter individual gene structure and regulation through any of the activities they promote: transposition, insertion, excision, chromosome breakage, and ectopic recombination. Many genes may have been assembled or amplified through the action of transposable elements, and it is likely that most plant genes contain legacies of multiple transposable element insertions into promoters. Because chromosomal rearrangements can lead to speciating infertility in heterozygous progeny, transposable elements may be responsible for the rate at which such incompatibility is generated in separated populations. For these reasons, understanding plant gene and genome evolution is only possible if we comprehend the contributions of transposable elements.

Journal

Plant Molecular BiologySpringer Journals

Published: Oct 16, 2004

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off