Transit and lifespan in neutrophil production: implications for drug intervention

Transit and lifespan in neutrophil production: implications for drug intervention A comparison of the transit compartment ordinary differential equation modelling approach to distributed and discrete delay differential equation models is studied by focusing on Quartino’s extension to the Friberg transit compartment model of myelosuppression, widely relied upon in the pharmaceutical sciences to predict the neutrophil response after chemotherapy, and on a QSP delay differential equation model of granulopoiesis. An extension to the Quartino model is provided by considering a general number of transit compartments and introducing an extra parameter that allows for the decoupling of the maturation time from the production rate of cells. An overview of the well established linear chain technique, used to reformulate transit compartment models with constant transit rates as distributed delay differential equations (DDEs), is then given. A state-dependent time rescaling of the Quartino model is performed to apply the linear chain technique and rewrite the Quartino model as a distributed DDE, yielding a discrete DDE model in a certain parameter limit. Next, stability and bifurcation analyses are undertaken in an effort to situate such studies in a mathematical pharmacology context. We show that both the original Friberg and the Quartino extension models incorrectly define the mean maturation time, essentially treating the proliferative pool as an additional maturation compartment. This misspecification can have far reaching consequences on the development of future models of myelosuppression in PK/PD. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Journal of Pharmacokinetics and Pharmacodynamics Springer Journals

Transit and lifespan in neutrophil production: implications for drug intervention

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Biomedicine; Pharmacology/Toxicology; Pharmacy; Veterinary Medicine/Veterinary Science; Biomedical Engineering; Biochemistry, general
ISSN
1567-567X
eISSN
1573-8744
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10928-017-9560-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

A comparison of the transit compartment ordinary differential equation modelling approach to distributed and discrete delay differential equation models is studied by focusing on Quartino’s extension to the Friberg transit compartment model of myelosuppression, widely relied upon in the pharmaceutical sciences to predict the neutrophil response after chemotherapy, and on a QSP delay differential equation model of granulopoiesis. An extension to the Quartino model is provided by considering a general number of transit compartments and introducing an extra parameter that allows for the decoupling of the maturation time from the production rate of cells. An overview of the well established linear chain technique, used to reformulate transit compartment models with constant transit rates as distributed delay differential equations (DDEs), is then given. A state-dependent time rescaling of the Quartino model is performed to apply the linear chain technique and rewrite the Quartino model as a distributed DDE, yielding a discrete DDE model in a certain parameter limit. Next, stability and bifurcation analyses are undertaken in an effort to situate such studies in a mathematical pharmacology context. We show that both the original Friberg and the Quartino extension models incorrectly define the mean maturation time, essentially treating the proliferative pool as an additional maturation compartment. This misspecification can have far reaching consequences on the development of future models of myelosuppression in PK/PD.

Journal

Journal of Pharmacokinetics and PharmacodynamicsSpringer Journals

Published: Dec 13, 2017

References

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