Towards an understanding of the marine fouling effects on VIV of circular cylinders: a probe into the chaotic features

Towards an understanding of the marine fouling effects on VIV of circular cylinders: a probe into... The current paper addresses the possibility of chaotic dynamics in the VIV response of cylinders covered by marine biofouling. The fouling was simulated by machining uniformly distributed pyramidal protrusions on the surface of the test cylinder. The Reynolds number varied from $$5.8\times 10^{3}$$ 5.8 × 10 3 to $$6.6\times 10^{4}$$ 6.6 × 10 4 . The zero-one tests, Hilbert Transforms and Poincaré maps were used to analyse the VIV test results. The chaos analysis showed that in the early initial branch and in the ending part of the synchronisation, the VIV signals for both the smooth and the artificially biofouled cylinders happened to be chaotic. The signals in between showed non-chaotic dynamics. The chaotic extent grew wider with the artificially biofouled cylinder than those with the smooth cylinder and in the lift force signals as compared to the displacement signals. Our estimates for the chaotic regions in the low mass-damping smooth cylinder interestingly agreed well with (i) zones for the “quasi-periodic” regime and (ii) the region marked as “no observed shedding pattern” in the literature. They singled out these regions because of their irregular dynamics but failed to appreciate these as chaotic. Here, we argue that these regions are in fact quite susceptible to chaos. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Nonlinear Dynamics Springer Journals

Towards an understanding of the marine fouling effects on VIV of circular cylinders: a probe into the chaotic features

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/towards-an-understanding-of-the-marine-fouling-effects-on-viv-of-03YahoYl0w
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer Science+Business Media B.V., part of Springer Nature
Subject
Engineering; Vibration, Dynamical Systems, Control; Classical Mechanics; Mechanical Engineering; Automotive Engineering
ISSN
0924-090X
eISSN
1573-269X
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11071-018-4378-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The current paper addresses the possibility of chaotic dynamics in the VIV response of cylinders covered by marine biofouling. The fouling was simulated by machining uniformly distributed pyramidal protrusions on the surface of the test cylinder. The Reynolds number varied from $$5.8\times 10^{3}$$ 5.8 × 10 3 to $$6.6\times 10^{4}$$ 6.6 × 10 4 . The zero-one tests, Hilbert Transforms and Poincaré maps were used to analyse the VIV test results. The chaos analysis showed that in the early initial branch and in the ending part of the synchronisation, the VIV signals for both the smooth and the artificially biofouled cylinders happened to be chaotic. The signals in between showed non-chaotic dynamics. The chaotic extent grew wider with the artificially biofouled cylinder than those with the smooth cylinder and in the lift force signals as compared to the displacement signals. Our estimates for the chaotic regions in the low mass-damping smooth cylinder interestingly agreed well with (i) zones for the “quasi-periodic” regime and (ii) the region marked as “no observed shedding pattern” in the literature. They singled out these regions because of their irregular dynamics but failed to appreciate these as chaotic. Here, we argue that these regions are in fact quite susceptible to chaos.

Journal

Nonlinear DynamicsSpringer Journals

Published: Jun 4, 2018

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off