Towards an Ethic of Authenticity: Nietzsche and the Phenomenism of Introspection

Towards an Ethic of Authenticity: Nietzsche and the Phenomenism of Introspection This essay will freely draw inspiration from Nietzsche’s thought (focused on Zarathustra, an artwork often set aside in ethics arguments), in order to build a definition of the perspective as a first step to ethic of authenticity, starting by enumerating what a perspective is not. How can we prove the existence of a substance which will be independent of the introspection? How can we be sure that this judgment is not a kind of illusion of our own mind? Most of the philosophers, according to Nietzsche, have been tempted by a retirement in a place that he calls a “desert,” what we would probably called probably today some “realism of value.” It seems to be an epistemic problem: philosophy attempts to build a system or, perhaps with more humility, tries to resolve fundamental antinomies of the existence or reality we can objectively reach by creating a closed system which can explain intellectually the reality with fundamental concepts. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Arenas Springer Journals

Towards an Ethic of Authenticity: Nietzsche and the Phenomenism of Introspection

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 by Springer International Publishing AG, part of Springer Nature
Subject
Psychology; Cognitive Psychology; Anthropology; Social Sciences, general
ISSN
2522-5790
eISSN
2522-5804
D.O.I.
10.1007/s42087-018-0022-x
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This essay will freely draw inspiration from Nietzsche’s thought (focused on Zarathustra, an artwork often set aside in ethics arguments), in order to build a definition of the perspective as a first step to ethic of authenticity, starting by enumerating what a perspective is not. How can we prove the existence of a substance which will be independent of the introspection? How can we be sure that this judgment is not a kind of illusion of our own mind? Most of the philosophers, according to Nietzsche, have been tempted by a retirement in a place that he calls a “desert,” what we would probably called probably today some “realism of value.” It seems to be an epistemic problem: philosophy attempts to build a system or, perhaps with more humility, tries to resolve fundamental antinomies of the existence or reality we can objectively reach by creating a closed system which can explain intellectually the reality with fundamental concepts.

Journal

Human ArenasSpringer Journals

Published: May 5, 2018

References

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