Titanium-dioxide-mediated photocatalysis reaction of three selected pesticide derivatives

Titanium-dioxide-mediated photocatalysis reaction of three selected pesticide derivatives The photocatalysis reaction of three selected pesticide derivatives, namely methoxychlor (1), chlorothalonil (2) and disulfoton (3), has been investigated in an acetonitrile/water mixture in the presence of titanium dioxide and oxygen. The change as a function of irradiation time has been monitored using the UV spectroscopic analysis technique. An attempt has been made to identify the product formed during the photooxidation process through GC/MS analysis technique. The photolysis of methoxychlor (1) led to the formation of methoxychlor olefin (4) and 4,4′-dimethoxybenzophenone (9), whereas chlorothalonil (2) gave rise to 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol (17) as the only product. On the other hand, the photolysis of disulfoton (3) under analogous conditions gave disulfoton sulfoxide (25) and phosphorodithioic acid (21). All the products have been identified by comparing the molecular ion and mass fragmentation peaks of the products with those reported in the library. A probable mechanism for the formation of the products has been proposed. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Research on Chemical Intermediates Springer Journals

Titanium-dioxide-mediated photocatalysis reaction of three selected pesticide derivatives

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Publisher
Brill Academic Publishers
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by 2004 VSP
Subject
Chemistry; Inorganic Chemistry; Physical Chemistry
ISSN
0922-6168
eISSN
1568-5675
D.O.I.
10.1163/1568567041570320
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The photocatalysis reaction of three selected pesticide derivatives, namely methoxychlor (1), chlorothalonil (2) and disulfoton (3), has been investigated in an acetonitrile/water mixture in the presence of titanium dioxide and oxygen. The change as a function of irradiation time has been monitored using the UV spectroscopic analysis technique. An attempt has been made to identify the product formed during the photooxidation process through GC/MS analysis technique. The photolysis of methoxychlor (1) led to the formation of methoxychlor olefin (4) and 4,4′-dimethoxybenzophenone (9), whereas chlorothalonil (2) gave rise to 2,3,4,5-tetrachlorophenol (17) as the only product. On the other hand, the photolysis of disulfoton (3) under analogous conditions gave disulfoton sulfoxide (25) and phosphorodithioic acid (21). All the products have been identified by comparing the molecular ion and mass fragmentation peaks of the products with those reported in the library. A probable mechanism for the formation of the products has been proposed.

Journal

Research on Chemical IntermediatesSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 9, 2004

References

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