The United Kingdom’s role in North Sea demersal fisheries: a hundred year perspective

The United Kingdom’s role in North Sea demersal fisheries: a hundred year perspective This study compiles 100 years of North Sea demersal landings, focusing on the UK, and relating them to historical events and political, technological and economical drivers that influenced demersal fisheries. In the early twentieth century, aided by technological advances, the UK, and in particular England, had unchallenged dominance in North Sea demersal fisheries. Since then, the two World Wars and other political developments have had a great impact on British fisheries. Between the 1920s and 1960s, English ports shifted their interests away from the North Sea towards highly profitable distant waters, whereas the Scottish fleet relied less on these fishing grounds. Meanwhile, especially in the 1960s, other European countries expanded their fisheries, undermining Britain’s lead. In the 1970s and 1980s, Scotland benefitted from mainly fishing in the North Sea. Firstly, the assertion of 200 nautical miles Exclusive Economic Zones made the distant waters inaccessible to English fleets at a time when England’s fisheries were highly dependent on them. Secondly, the relatively minor activity in the North Sea by the English compared to the Scottish fleets coincided with the establishment of the Common Fisheries Policy. This had implications when total allowable catches were first implemented because quota allocations to countries were based on their recent catches from the North Sea. Thus, after the loss of fishing opportunities in distant waters, the North Sea once more became an important fishing ground for Britain, just as in the early twentieth century, however, the emphasis of fisheries had shifted from England to Scotland. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries Springer Journals

The United Kingdom’s role in North Sea demersal fisheries: a hundred year perspective

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-united-kingdom-s-role-in-north-sea-demersal-fisheries-a-hundred-jQcvP5MAWa
Publisher
Springer Netherlands
Copyright
Copyright © 2012 by Her Majesty the Queen in Rights of the United Kingdom
Subject
Life Sciences; Zoology; Freshwater & Marine Ecology
ISSN
0960-3166
eISSN
1573-5184
D.O.I.
10.1007/s11160-012-9261-y
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study compiles 100 years of North Sea demersal landings, focusing on the UK, and relating them to historical events and political, technological and economical drivers that influenced demersal fisheries. In the early twentieth century, aided by technological advances, the UK, and in particular England, had unchallenged dominance in North Sea demersal fisheries. Since then, the two World Wars and other political developments have had a great impact on British fisheries. Between the 1920s and 1960s, English ports shifted their interests away from the North Sea towards highly profitable distant waters, whereas the Scottish fleet relied less on these fishing grounds. Meanwhile, especially in the 1960s, other European countries expanded their fisheries, undermining Britain’s lead. In the 1970s and 1980s, Scotland benefitted from mainly fishing in the North Sea. Firstly, the assertion of 200 nautical miles Exclusive Economic Zones made the distant waters inaccessible to English fleets at a time when England’s fisheries were highly dependent on them. Secondly, the relatively minor activity in the North Sea by the English compared to the Scottish fleets coincided with the establishment of the Common Fisheries Policy. This had implications when total allowable catches were first implemented because quota allocations to countries were based on their recent catches from the North Sea. Thus, after the loss of fishing opportunities in distant waters, the North Sea once more became an important fishing ground for Britain, just as in the early twentieth century, however, the emphasis of fisheries had shifted from England to Scotland.

Journal

Reviews in Fish Biology and FisheriesSpringer Journals

Published: Mar 13, 2012

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 12 million articles from more than
10,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Unlimited reading

Read as many articles as you need. Full articles with original layout, charts and figures. Read online, from anywhere.

Stay up to date

Keep up with your field with Personalized Recommendations and Follow Journals to get automatic updates.

Organize your research

It’s easy to organize your research with our built-in tools.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve Freelancer

DeepDyve Pro

Price
FREE
$49/month

$360/year
Save searches from Google Scholar, PubMed
Create lists to organize your research
Export lists, citations
Access to DeepDyve database
Abstract access only
Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles
Print
20 pages/month
PDF Discount
20% off