The Tyr (albino) locus of the laboratory mouse

The Tyr (albino) locus of the laboratory mouse The albino mouse was already known in ancient times and was apparently selectively bred in Egypt, China, and Japan. Thus, it is not surprising that the c or albino locus (now the Tyr locus) was among the first used to demonstrate Mendelian inheritance in mammals at the dawn of the past century. This locus is now known to encode tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of melanin pigment, and the molecular basis of the albino (Tyr c ) mutation is known. Here we describe the congenic series of Tyr-locus alleles, from wild type to null (albino). We compare eye and skin pigmentation phenotypes and the genetic lesions that cause each. We suggest that this panel of congenic mutants contains rich, untapped resources for the study of many questions of basic cell biological interest. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

The Tyr (albino) locus of the laboratory mouse

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Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2004 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Life Sciences; Anatomy; Cell Biology; Zoology
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-004-4002-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

The albino mouse was already known in ancient times and was apparently selectively bred in Egypt, China, and Japan. Thus, it is not surprising that the c or albino locus (now the Tyr locus) was among the first used to demonstrate Mendelian inheritance in mammals at the dawn of the past century. This locus is now known to encode tyrosinase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of melanin pigment, and the molecular basis of the albino (Tyr c ) mutation is known. Here we describe the congenic series of Tyr-locus alleles, from wild type to null (albino). We compare eye and skin pigmentation phenotypes and the genetic lesions that cause each. We suggest that this panel of congenic mutants contains rich, untapped resources for the study of many questions of basic cell biological interest.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Jan 1, 2004

References

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