The Same, but Different: Indigenous Knowledge Retention, Erosion, and Innovation in the Brazilian Amazon

The Same, but Different: Indigenous Knowledge Retention, Erosion, and Innovation in the Brazilian... This study explores how indigenous knowledge (IK) might be retained and/or changed among contemporary indigenous peoples. Through semi-structured interviews and quantitative analyses of long-term changes in artistic knowledge among three geographically displaced Kaiabi (Kawaiwete) we found an association between language proficiency and gender with greater IK retention, and formal schooling with IK erosion. Six mechanisms of innovation in knowledge of basketry and textiles among men and women were documented. A mixed mode of collaborative learning and knowledge transmission involving diverse actors emerged from community workshops and group forums. Innovative mechanisms for cultural transmission have taken advantage of media, technology, and non-indigenous support organizations to expand weaving knowledge of basketry designs. Our results illustrate how indigenous peoples actively shape cultural transmission and change, as well as the role that public policies and academic research may play in these processes. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Human Ecology Springer Journals

The Same, but Different: Indigenous Knowledge Retention, Erosion, and Innovation in the Brazilian Amazon

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Publisher
Springer US
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Social Sciences; Anthropology; Environmental Management; Geography, general; Sociology, general
ISSN
0300-7839
eISSN
1572-9915
D.O.I.
10.1007/s10745-017-9919-0
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

This study explores how indigenous knowledge (IK) might be retained and/or changed among contemporary indigenous peoples. Through semi-structured interviews and quantitative analyses of long-term changes in artistic knowledge among three geographically displaced Kaiabi (Kawaiwete) we found an association between language proficiency and gender with greater IK retention, and formal schooling with IK erosion. Six mechanisms of innovation in knowledge of basketry and textiles among men and women were documented. A mixed mode of collaborative learning and knowledge transmission involving diverse actors emerged from community workshops and group forums. Innovative mechanisms for cultural transmission have taken advantage of media, technology, and non-indigenous support organizations to expand weaving knowledge of basketry designs. Our results illustrate how indigenous peoples actively shape cultural transmission and change, as well as the role that public policies and academic research may play in these processes.

Journal

Human EcologySpringer Journals

Published: Aug 4, 2017

References

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