The role of actin filaments in ascovirus replication and pathology

The role of actin filaments in ascovirus replication and pathology Ascoviruses (AVs) are insect viruses transmitted by parasitoid wasps. The unique pathology in host cells upon AV infection includes enlargement, blebbing and cleavage of host cells into virus-containing vesicles that are important in dissemination of the virus. The mechanism of pathogenesis and vesicle formation is largely unknown. Here, we explored involvement of actin filaments in virus entry, replication and pathology. The results suggested that entry of Heliothis virescens ascovirus-3e (HvAV-3e) leads to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. After HvAV-3e infection, actin filaments were found in foci rather than in a homogenous distribution within the cytoplasm. Actin filaments were also found concentrating around blebs and vesiculation areas of the cell cortex following infection. Destabilization of filamentous actin by cytochalasin D did not inhibit entry or replication of the virus but affected vesiculation and pathology associated with HvAV-3e infection. These observations suggested that actin may not be required for virus entry and replication but essential for virus pathology, mainly vesicle formation. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Archives of Virology Springer Journals

The role of actin filaments in ascovirus replication and pathology

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Publisher
Springer Vienna
Copyright
Copyright © 2009 by Springer-Verlag
Subject
Biomedicine; Infectious Diseases; Medical Microbiology ; Virology
ISSN
0304-8608
eISSN
1432-8798
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00705-009-0512-8
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Ascoviruses (AVs) are insect viruses transmitted by parasitoid wasps. The unique pathology in host cells upon AV infection includes enlargement, blebbing and cleavage of host cells into virus-containing vesicles that are important in dissemination of the virus. The mechanism of pathogenesis and vesicle formation is largely unknown. Here, we explored involvement of actin filaments in virus entry, replication and pathology. The results suggested that entry of Heliothis virescens ascovirus-3e (HvAV-3e) leads to rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton. After HvAV-3e infection, actin filaments were found in foci rather than in a homogenous distribution within the cytoplasm. Actin filaments were also found concentrating around blebs and vesiculation areas of the cell cortex following infection. Destabilization of filamentous actin by cytochalasin D did not inhibit entry or replication of the virus but affected vesiculation and pathology associated with HvAV-3e infection. These observations suggested that actin may not be required for virus entry and replication but essential for virus pathology, mainly vesicle formation.

Journal

Archives of VirologySpringer Journals

Published: Nov 1, 2009

References

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