The road less traveled: from genotype to phenotype in flies and humans

The road less traveled: from genotype to phenotype in flies and humans Understanding how genomic variation gives rise to phenotypic variation is essential for elucidating mechanisms of adaptive evolution, plant and animal breeding, and precision medicine. However, identifying causal links between DNA sequence variants and variation in phenotypes is challenging in human populations, due to large blocks of linkage disequilibrium in the genome and heterogeneous developmental histories, lifestyles, and social and physical environments. Drosophila melanogaster presents a powerful genetic model, since linkage disequilibrium decays rapidly, facilitating assignment of causality to polymorphisms associated with phenotypic variation, and large numbers of individuals can be reared under defined environmental conditions, economically, and without regulatory restrictions. The D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), a population of 205 sequenced, inbred wild-derived flies, has enabled genome-wide association studies of morphological, physiological, behavioral, and life history traits, and demonstrated that genetic architectures of complex traits are highly polygenic, sexually dimorphic, and context dependent with extensive sex-, environment-, and genetic background (epistatic) effects. These features together with a modular organization of the transcriptome illustrate a dynamic integrative genetic architecture for complex traits. The complexity of the genetic architectures for complex traits in Drosophila provides important caveats for the interpretation of genetic studies in human populations. Aspects of the genetic underpinnings of complex traits can be represented as simplified gene networks on which human orthologues can be superimposed to provide blueprints for subsequent studies on analogous traits in human populations. Fundamental principles of the genetic architectures of Drosophila complex traits are likely applicable across phyla, from the DGRP to human populations. http://www.deepdyve.com/assets/images/DeepDyve-Logo-lg.png Mammalian Genome Springer Journals

The road less traveled: from genotype to phenotype in flies and humans

Loading next page...
 
/lp/springer_journal/the-road-less-traveled-from-genotype-to-phenotype-in-flies-and-humans-sAEaFjtnWa
Publisher
Springer Journals
Copyright
Copyright © 2017 by Springer Science+Business Media, LLC
Subject
Life Sciences; Cell Biology; Animal Genetics and Genomics; Human Genetics
ISSN
0938-8990
eISSN
1432-1777
D.O.I.
10.1007/s00335-017-9722-7
Publisher site
See Article on Publisher Site

Abstract

Understanding how genomic variation gives rise to phenotypic variation is essential for elucidating mechanisms of adaptive evolution, plant and animal breeding, and precision medicine. However, identifying causal links between DNA sequence variants and variation in phenotypes is challenging in human populations, due to large blocks of linkage disequilibrium in the genome and heterogeneous developmental histories, lifestyles, and social and physical environments. Drosophila melanogaster presents a powerful genetic model, since linkage disequilibrium decays rapidly, facilitating assignment of causality to polymorphisms associated with phenotypic variation, and large numbers of individuals can be reared under defined environmental conditions, economically, and without regulatory restrictions. The D. melanogaster Genetic Reference Panel (DGRP), a population of 205 sequenced, inbred wild-derived flies, has enabled genome-wide association studies of morphological, physiological, behavioral, and life history traits, and demonstrated that genetic architectures of complex traits are highly polygenic, sexually dimorphic, and context dependent with extensive sex-, environment-, and genetic background (epistatic) effects. These features together with a modular organization of the transcriptome illustrate a dynamic integrative genetic architecture for complex traits. The complexity of the genetic architectures for complex traits in Drosophila provides important caveats for the interpretation of genetic studies in human populations. Aspects of the genetic underpinnings of complex traits can be represented as simplified gene networks on which human orthologues can be superimposed to provide blueprints for subsequent studies on analogous traits in human populations. Fundamental principles of the genetic architectures of Drosophila complex traits are likely applicable across phyla, from the DGRP to human populations.

Journal

Mammalian GenomeSpringer Journals

Published: Oct 20, 2017

References

You’re reading a free preview. Subscribe to read the entire article.


DeepDyve is your
personal research library

It’s your single place to instantly
discover and read the research
that matters to you.

Enjoy affordable access to
over 18 million articles from more than
15,000 peer-reviewed journals.

All for just $49/month

Explore the DeepDyve Library

Search

Query the DeepDyve database, plus search all of PubMed and Google Scholar seamlessly

Organize

Save any article or search result from DeepDyve, PubMed, and Google Scholar... all in one place.

Access

Get unlimited, online access to over 18 million full-text articles from more than 15,000 scientific journals.

Your journals are on DeepDyve

Read from thousands of the leading scholarly journals from SpringerNature, Elsevier, Wiley-Blackwell, Oxford University Press and more.

All the latest content is available, no embargo periods.

See the journals in your area

DeepDyve

Freelancer

DeepDyve

Pro

Price

FREE

$49/month
$360/year

Save searches from
Google Scholar,
PubMed

Create lists to
organize your research

Export lists, citations

Read DeepDyve articles

Abstract access only

Unlimited access to over
18 million full-text articles

Print

20 pages / month

PDF Discount

20% off